It’s that time of year again when we roll out the 100 best marketing ideas. This year’s list is a little different. We’ve finally joined the twenty-first century and have gone interactive. We’re encouraging all of our readers to go to our 100 best page on the website and vote on the ideas listed.

In addition, you have the opportunity to go to the comments section at the bottom of the page and add your own top sales and marketing ideas. Look for a complete list of the 100 best ideas in our June issue. Until then, enjoy 10 of the ideas that I’ve included below.

1. My 5-year-old son and I have enjoyed father-son bonding while making May Day baskets for my best clients over the past several years. He’ll even help me deliver them this year! Often, my voice box is full of “thank-yous” from grateful clients before I even get back to the office and my son brags to his friends about the quality time we got to spend together, and I’ve touched my clients in a unique and special way! – Scott Wirtz

2. My best sales idea is the way I conduct my practice, I look at the whole client and not a part of them. I then put a plan together to help them reach their goals and not what the book says they should have. I believe each client is different and so their plan should reflect their goals and objectives. – Tim Fitzgerald

3. Info Bingo – put answers to basic insurance on a bingo style card where attendees can then win prizes for providing answers (used after a seminar). – Cassie Monson

4. Regular and consistent emailing to my customer, prospect and networking list has produced fantastic results. The key is to be relevant, topical and instill a sense of urgency into each message. This type of messaging practice makes you a trusted and sought after resource of information people look forward to hearing from. – Gregory Durette

5. I host a weekly radio show addressing important issues in retirement and brand myself as the “Retirement Guy” in the Denver Metro Area and find great success through a weekly call to action to request one of my free “Special Reports” mentioned in the radio show. – Stephen Geist

6. I have specialized in working with teachers for 18 years. By becoming a specialist in this niche market of working with educators it has allowed me to grow my business. 50 percent of my new business comes in from referrals every year. This is still a very untapped market that is waiting to be serviced. I will never run out of new prospects. – John Bustrum

7. Ninety-five percent of my business is with mature clients. I found after 30 years in the business, my prospects were beginning to dwindle. My baby boomers were getting older and their incomes and investments were usually invested with me. I began to invite their children to sit in on reviews at least once a year. I found they became clients as well. And beyond that, I discuss and attempt to place business with their children for college expense. An additional benefit, I feel more comfortable knowing my client’s children are aware of their parent’s investments and the all the benefits associated with these investments. – Stephen Jorgenson

8. One of the most important aspects of my business is treating your client as if it were yourself. This in turn helps make the client more at easy and they will feel you if you are authentic and trustworthy. In return you have a good referral partner client that will be selling you to all of their friends and family members. But you have to be you and go above and beyond the call of duty. – Alejandro Chetto

9. Private Client Dinners: I will contact a group of 4-6 clients and let them know that I want to keep them up to date with what’s going on in the economy and would like to invite them along with their family and friends to a complimentary dinner seminar at a Ruth’s Chris style restaurant. Most clients bring 2-5 guests each and I’ve been able to acquire new clients as a result, all with no marketing costs. – Anthony A. Saccaro

10. Our firm is successful because we focus on issues beyond the client’s finances. For example, our firm process looks at the impact that an individual can have on their family, business and community. Certainly this involves financial planning because all individuals need to feel secure in their own plan before they can realize that they can make an impact or leave a legacy on others. This naturally ties in with why it is important to have asset protection and secure income as part of the financial plan. Showing a client the impact that they can make to their family and community can be a wonderful motivator to take action. – Greg Hammond