If you read part one, you now have some ideas of good questions to ask in your evaluation form. There are a couple more helpful ideas to have.

Ask your attendees if they plan on attending future events and if they would likely bring a guest. Also ask for input on ideas for future events or how you can improve the event next time. Supplemental questions include:

  • How likely are you to attend one of our future presentations?
  • How likely are you to invite a guest to a future presentation?
  • What topic(s) would you like to see in future presentations?
  • Do you have additional comments about today’s presentation?

Call to action: At the bottom of your evaluation form, include a box for attendees to check that says, “I would like to schedule a consultation to discus my personal situation.” Adding this one sentence makes it simple for your attendees to tell you that they are interested in your services.

Email opt-in: While collecting email addresses is an important part of an event marketing strategy, you want to ensure you are asking people to opt-in to receive your emails. Include a statement at the bottom of your evaluation form indicating that, by providing an email address on this form, the attendee is agreeing to receive future email communication from you.

You may have an inclination to try to ask qualifying questions, such as net worth, but be careful not to ask questions that would deter someone from filling out the form. Focus your evaluation form on gathering the information required to help you improve future events, and that helps you follow up with attendees following the event.

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Kristen Luke is the principal of Wealth Management Marketing, a firm dedicated to providing marketing strategies and support for registered investment advisory firms. For more information, visit www.wealthmanagementmarketing.net.