The other day, I received an email pitching a story about Web 3.0.

Why do I feel like we just finished helping readers understand the concept of Web 2.0 – interactive rather than static information, such as what you’d find through social media networks like Twitter and LinkedIn – and how it relates to their business?

Oh, yeah. Probably because we did.

The concept of obsolescence should not be foreign to anybody who’s spent at least a couple of years operating a computer and conducting even the most basic of Internet searches. When I first jumped online in 1997, things were markedly different than they are now. People built their Web sites on Geocities and used Altavista for their Internet searches. Internet Relay Chat was about as interactive as things got. And it’s not just the Internet. Remember floppy disks? Now, you have to pay extra to get a disk drive with your computer.

In order to stay ahead of your competitors and keep up with what your clients and prospects expect, you need to be on the cutting-edge of what’s available in your specific industry. This much you probably already know.

Thing is, there’s not much cutting-edge in terms of what the insurance industry is producing. Or is there?

In our December 2009 print edition, we published our annual technology guide. In it, we asked readers to share with us what tech tools they use most in their day-to-day insurance business.

Their answers ranged from the BlackBerry and social media to CRMs and (wait for it) the telephone.

In other words, tools that can be used regardless of the industry in which you work.

In order to begin a dialogue about what insurance agents really need in order to do their jobs more effectively, then, I’d like to invite all of you to comment here on what tech tools you’re missing, or which ones you use that you feel can be improved upon.

So, then, what about you? What can the industry do to help you work better? Leave your comments below.