Hard on the heels of the Financial Planning Association’s decision to consolidate its dual headquarters, leave Atlanta, and make the former Institute of Certified Financial Planners’ home base of Denver its single head office, Janet G. McCallen, executive director and CEO of the Financial Planning Association, has been ousted. “The leadership of the FPA talked to me and said, ‘it was time for a change,’ and I agreed,” McCallen said in an interview.

McCallen, formerly the executive director of the Atlanta-based International Association for Financial Planning, took the top administrative job at the FPA after the merger of the IAFP and ICFP in January 2000 and the resignation of co-executive director David Brand later that year. Marvin W. Tuttle, a 20-year veteran of the ICFP and FPA as well as the FPA’s associate executive director and editor and publisher of the Journal of Financial Planning, was named to succeed McCallen as the association’s executive director after she announced her resignation Jan. 13.

“I have been privileged to work with many exceptional individuals throughout the years, and I am very grateful for that,” McCallen said earlier in a prepared statement. “I will continue to desire and believe in FPA’s success and prosperity. And I know that with the insight and guidance of FPA’s Board and staff, that will happen.” In a separate statement, FPA President Elizabeth Jetton expressed her “deep appreciation” for McCallen’s “service and leadership in moving the association and the financial planning profession forward.”

Tuttle and Jetton were not immediately available for comment.

McCallen, who characterized her ouster as “kind of a surprise,” said she doesn’t see “any abrupt changes” in FPA strategy now that the association “is coming to the close of its merger phase.” Still, she has long recognized the need for change in trade associations. In 1999, while still with the IAFP, McCallen wrote in an article for Government Relations, a publication of the American Society of Association Executives, that “remaking the association every three to five years is what we need to do.” To help achieve that, she argued, trade associations must not shirk when it comes to capital spending. “If we don’t stop providing certain services or producing certain products, how will we ever generate sufficient resources to invest in the innovation necessary to remake the association every three to five years?” she asked. “Capital expenditures…must be a key ingredient in how we remake ourselves every few years.”

Another IAFP veteran, Education Director Bud Elsea, resigned from the FPA last June to set up a conference production business.