Chris Flint, president and CEO of ProEquities, Inc. was elected as large firm governor Monday to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s Board, while Linde Murphy, M.E. Allison & Co., Inc.’s chief compliance officer was elected as one of three small firm representatives.

Flint and Murphy, two newly elected governors, join two new public governors on FINRA’s board.

The two new public governors, who were selected by the nominating committee and approved by the full board at FINRA’s July meeting in Washington, are:

  • Camille Busette, director of the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative and senior fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution; and
  • Ethiopis Tafara, vice president and general counsel of Legal, Compliance Risk and Sustainability at the International Finance Corporation (part of the World Bank Group).

“Our new board members bring with them a broad array of backgrounds and experiences,” said FINRA CEO Robert Cook, in a statement. “Their diverse perspectives will be a valuable contribution to our ongoing commitment to protecting investors and ensuring vibrant markets.”

Dale Brown, president and CEO of the Financial Services Institute, said in a Monday statement that FSI was “proud to endorse Chris and work hard to help bring his commitment to investor protection and fresh perspectives to the FINRA board.”

One of FSI’s “top goals is to make the value of the independent model to investors better understood by all stakeholders,” Brown said. “Having now helped our third petition candidate secure a FINRA board seat in the last four years, we’re more confident than ever that strong progress is being made toward this goal.”

FINRA is overseen by a 24-member Board of Governors, the majority of whom are public members. The industry governors include three from large firms, one from medium-size firms, three from small firms, one floor member, one independent dealer/insurance affiliate and one investment company affiliate.

Governors are appointed or elected to three-year terms and may not serve more than two consecutive terms.

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