A health care provider (Photo: Shutterstock) (Image: Shutterstock)

Health Agents for America (HAFA) has come up with a way to pester several different health advocacy birds with one stone: It’s backing efforts by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) to ease state restrictions on nurse practitioners’ ability to practice.

(Related: Physician Assistants Seek a Place in the Directory)

HAFA is a scrappy Baton Rouge, Louisiana-based group that has taken an aggressive approach to representing agents in the individual health insurance market in the face of freezing apathy toward U.S. commercial individual major medical insurance from most of the rest of the universe since about 201.5

AANP met in New Orleans recently in an effort to stump for more regulatory flexibility for nurse practitioners in Louisiana and other states.

Nurse Practitioners Key to Strengthening Louisiana Primary Health Care Access Community Leaders Discuss Policy Solutions to Give Patients Provider Choice, Access

HAFA has put out emails asking its own supporters to support the AANP effort.

Some physicians have argued that giving nurse practitioners to much authority to operate independently could reduce the chances that patients with unusual, seemingly minor but potentially important symptoms will catch the attention of a provider who will understand what those symptoms means.

AANP and many other organizations have argued that expanding nurse practitioners’ scope of authority is a simple, safe way to expand the health care supply at a time when primary care providers are in increasingly short supply, especially in rural areas.

AANP has also succeeded at persuading 22 states and the District of Columbia to give patients direct access to nurse practitioners, without requiring them to go through physicians.

For HAFA, supporting AANP is a way to help expand the supply of health care providers; support another organization with strong ties to Louisiana; and support another group that represents many independent professionals.

Supporting AANP could also be a way for HAFA build a good relationship with AANP, which represents 248,000 nurse practitioners and has a large, highly effective advocacy organization of its own.

HAFA is asking its members to look for ways to support the AANP effort here.

— Read A Radical Way to Rein In Occupational Licensing, on ThinkAdvisor.

— Connect with ThinkAdvisor Life/Health on LinkedIn and Twitter.