Some consumers are so confused by health insurance terminology that they think the deductible represents the amount of medical expenses a plan will cover each year. (Image: Thinkstock)

One of the goals of the creators of the Affordable Care Act was to improve consumers’ health insurance shopping literacy.

Analysts at Corporate Insight Inc., a New York-based market research firm, have found lingering weakness in this area.

The firm offers insurers advice on how to improve their websites. Recently, the company asked 1,053 U.S. adult consumers to define the term “deductible.”

Related: Firm assesses consumer-facing health insurance sites

Forty-nine percent knew that a health insurance deductible is “the amount you pay before your insurance company pays benefits.”

Another 17.5 percent gave an answer that might sound good to healthy people who never meet their coverage deductible: that the deductible is “the amount you pay before your health expenses are covered in full.”

Another 7.5 percent of the survey participants admitted that they weren’t sure what a deductible is.

But 18.5 percent said they thought the deductible is “an amount deducted from your paycheck to pay for your insurance premium,” and 7.5 percent said they thought the deductible is the total amount of medical expenses a health plan covers each year. 

Related:

ACA World dictionary expands

Blues: Consumers no speak no ACA-ese

We’re on Facebook, are you?