The recent presidential campaign season has not been a major breeding ground for detailed employee benefits proposals.

Donald Trump seems to dislike the Affordable Care Act and want to shift to programs based more on use of health savings accounts and other tax-advantaged accounts controlled by individual people.

Hillary Clinton seems to be skeptical about efforts to repeal the ACA. She has talked occasionally about the possibility of letting older people under the age of 65 buy into Medicare and creating new paid sick-leave mandates.

But Trump controls the Trump Organization, a New York City-based real estate development company, and Clinton seems to have been involved with running the New York City-based Clinton Foundation.  

The Clinton Foundation and a number of Trump-related companies have submitted Form 5500 filings, or informational returns for benefit plans. The U.S. Department of Labor publishes Form 5500 filing data on the web.

The Labor Department wants to make all group health plans file 5500s.

Related: Feds extend Form 5500 revision comment period 

Today, many group health plan sponsors do not have to file 5500s.

The Clintons are affiliated with at least three different filing entities, and Trump is affiliated with at least five entities that have his name, and his name, only.

Here’s a peek at a sampling of data from 2015 5500 filing data from 5500s and Form 5500 Schedule A filings for the William J. Clinton Foundation Group Benefit Plan and the Chicago-based Trump Commercial Chicago Health and Welfare Plan, two entities with headquarters addresses in the Midwest.

Two takeaways: Trump might be tender-hearted enough to value employee assistance programs, and Clinton might be conscious enough of problems with high employee out-of-pocket costs to know that some consumers want supplemental health benefits. 

Clinton Foundation

The Clinton Foundation reported offering the following benefits:

  • A Cigna unit provided health coverage, dental coverage and evacuation benefits for 11 people at the end of 2015. The insurer received $118,440 in payments. The broker received $10,463 in commissions.

  • Unimerica Insurance Company provided stop-loss coverage for benefits for 296 people. The insurer received $291,859 in payments. . The broker received $11,674 in commissions.

  • Life Insurance Co. of America provided life, disability and accidental death & dismemberment coverage for 11 people at the end of 2015. The insurer received $6,007 in premiums. The broker received $677 in commissions.

  • Transamerica Life Insurance Co. provided accident insurance and cancer insurance, or gap filler insurance, for 34 people at the end of 2015. It received $6,767 in premiums. The broker received $817 in commissions.

  • Vision Service Plan provided vision coverage for 199 people at the end of 2015. It received $25,430 in payments. The broker received $1,269 in commissions.

Trump Commercial

Trump Commercial reported offering the following benefits:

  • Aetna provided life insurance, short-term disability insurance, long-term disability insurance and AD&D coverage for 396 people at the end of 2015. It received $123,511 in premiums. The broker received $7,175 in commissions.

  • Cigna provided dental coverage for 358 people at the end of 2015. It received $181,544 in premiums. The broker received $21,015 in commissions.

  • UnitedHealth provided health coverage and vision coverage for 592 people at the end of 2015. It received $2.8 million in premiums. Brokers received $1,651 in commissions and $83,979 in fees.

  • Magellan Health Services ran an employee assistance program that served 423 people at the end of 2015. It received $8,084 in payments. The broker received $970 in commissions.

Related:

Gobeille v. Liberty Mutual: Supreme Court justices question Vermont’s self-insured plan data call

View: What we know about Hillary Clinton’s platform

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