This version of the story has been updated with details from the final vote.

Members of the House have paved the way for a showdown with the White House by voting 240-181 to pass H.R. 3762, a bill that would kill key sections of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) that affect Medicaid and the commercial health insurance market.

The bill would eliminate the PPACA individual and employer mandates, phase out funding for the PPACA public exchange subsidy programs, and eliminate PPACA Medicaid expansion funding. The bill also would de-fund Planned Parenthood and cut funding for a home care attendant services support program.

The bill would leave the PPACA ban on use of personal health information other than age, tobacco use and location in individual major medical underwriting in place.

In the qfloor debate, Republican supporters of the bill promoted it as a cure for the failures of PPACA, and PPACA interference in relationships between doctors.

Democratic critics called the bill an attack on people’s ability to keep their health insurance, and on women’s ability to get access to care for women.

See also: CBO: PPACA bill may lead to 55% rise in uninsured count

During a preliminary vote, on whether to bring the bill up for a final vote, all 237 of the Republicans who voted supported consideration of the bill, and all 177 Democrats who voted opposed consideration of the bill.

Three Republicans voted against the bill. They are Bob Dold of Illinois, Richard Hanna of Virginia, and John Katko of New York.

One Democrat, Collin Peterson of Minnesota, voted for the bill.

Hanna said in a statement issued before the vote that he supports repealing PPACA.

“I firmly believe that Obamacare was hastily developed, ideologically driven and has fundamentally failed to fix our broken health care system,” he said. “That is why I have voted more than 60 times to repeal it. However, the outcome this evening will be no different. The president will veto this bill and it will not become law. It is a political vote that will accomplish nothing. Instead, it is time we start focusing on practical solutions that replace the law with reforms that will bring down costs, improve access to care and improve outcomes.”

Republican leaders got H.R. 3762 through the Senate in December, through a special budget reconciliation procedure which lets budget-related bills get through the Senate with just 51 votes, rather than the 60 votes needed to get an ordinary bill through the Senate.

The White House says President Obama will veto the bill if it crosses his desk.

Bill supporters would need to get two-thirds majorities in both the House and the Senate to overturn a veto.

See also:

CBO cuts PPACA exchange subsidy spending estimate

Ky. Health Ins. Market Faces More Disruption

 

Have you followed us on Facebook?