Close Close
ThinkAdvisor

Life Health > Health Insurance

CCIIO posts Web broker entity list

X
Your article was successfully shared with the contacts you provided.

Managers of the HealthCare.gov exchange system continue to face lawsuits, attacks in Congress and complaints about administration, but they also seem to be expanding their distribution network.

Officials at the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight (CCIIO) have shed a little light on the size of HealthCare.gov exchanges’ distribution muscle by updating their list of registered Web broker entities, or brokers that have qualified to connect directly with HealthCare.gov systems.

The number of registered HealthCare.gov Web brokers increased to 54 as of April 27, from 34 on Dec. 8, 2014, according to a comparison of the latest Web broker list and an earlier version of the list published in December.

In some cases, interpreting the list can be tricky, because organizations may be using subsidiaries or other types of affiliates to connect with the exchange system.

The HealthMarkets Insurance Agency, for example, connected under that name in December but was connecting to the exchange system under the Insphere name in April. 

Some of the companies that appear to be new to the Web broker entity list include Cross Employee Benefits, a regional broker; Softheon, a public exchange construction and management company; HGS Colibrium Inc., a business process outsourcing company; and HoneyInsured Insurance Services, a company creating a mobile-based public and private exchange enrollment app.

See also: Federal exchanges make deal with Web broker

CCIIO is the arm of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in charge of running the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) exchanges operated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), 

See also: CCIIO: HSA plans are still possible 

CCIIO officials said in May 2013, in an answer to questions submitted by brokers, that brokers wanting to help consumers enroll in exchange qualified health plans (QHPs) through exchange systems would have to put workers with access to personal health information through fingerprint-based criminal background checks.