The SEC is boosting its technology strategies.

The Securities and Exchange Commission announced Thursday that Pamela C. Dyson has been named the SEC’s chief information officer in charge of overseeing the agency’s information technology functions.

In her new role as head of the SEC’s Office of Information Technology, Dyson will work SEC Chairwoman Mary Jo White, the agency’s commissioners as well as its divisions and offices to incorporate technology into SEC programs.

“Pam has been instrumental in our ongoing efforts to enhance the Commission’s information technology capabilities,” said White in a statement. “I am confident she will provide the expertise, leadership and vision necessary to further advance the Commission’s technology operations.

Dyson has served as acting CIO since October 2014, and has held key positions in the Office of Information Technology since she came to the commission in 2010, including deputy CIO.

“Pam is a strong and effective leader who will continue to provide a strategic vision on all major SEC information technology initiatives,” said Jeff Heslop, the agency’s chief operating officer. “The OIT team as well as the entire commission will benefit from her seamless transition to CIO.”

As deputy CIO, Dyson oversaw the Commission’s information technology program and played a leading role in enhancing the SEC’s technological capabilities and the modernization of key service delivery platforms and business applications. She supervised the agency’s big data and data management initiatives to make it easier for users to quickly search and access critical data from a centralized source, implemented strategies to advance information security, and enhanced critical infrastructure operations in support of the SEC’s mission.

Dyson said, “I am honored to serve as chief information officer and I look forward to driving a technology strategy that supports the SEC’s mission. It is a privilege to be able to continue working with the many talented professionals at the SEC as we deliver innovative and effective solutions.”

The agency has said that it will use some of the $1.5 billion budget boost that it received under the Cromnibus spending bill that passed in December to “modernize” its technology.

— Check out SEC to Mull Accredited Investors, Advisor Succession Plan Rules on ThinkAdvisor.