The drafters of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) created a whole new regulatory world – and a whole new regulatory language.

Agents and brokers in the U.S. health insurance market now have to understand terms such as QHP (qualified health plan), EHB (essential health benefits package) and APTC (advance premium tax credit), that’s just to figure out their own families’ health coverage.

To be a real player, producers have to read new drafts of Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 1095-A, Form 1095-B and Form 1095-C as if they were new Harry Potter sequels. Sort of like books about a bizarre, magical school for wizards, told from the perspective of Lord Voldemort’s assistant under secretary for the Employee Benefits Sorcery Administration.

Even some of the drafters of the IRS PPACA tax form instructions seem to be silently pleading, in the invisible margins of the drafts, “Don’t get mad at me. I’m just trying to translate the law into a form as well as I can, given that the law seems to have been written by mice that crawled around on a Harry Reid aide’s computer keyboard.”

To test your preparedness understand PPACA jargon, wrestle with our PPACA acronym challenge.