For-profit brokers and nonprofit assisters are competing for public health insurance exchange prospects in Colorado.

The competition between the brokers and the assisters came up in September at a Connect for Health board meeting. Roxanne Johnson, director of community-based programs at the state-based exchange, talked about enrollee assistance programs.

One board member asked about what happens when the state’s nonprofit assisters — health coverage guides and certified application counselors —  ”do all the work, and the customer enrolls offsite, or through a local broker,” according to the meeting minutes.

Johnson said the nonprofit assisters sometimes have trouble getting credit for their efforts to help consumers. “We are in business to help people, and sites have not always received the credit for doing the work,” Johnson said.

Lindy Hinman, an exchange staff member, said Connect for Health is trying to do a better job of recording which consumers get help from a nonprofit health coverage guide, then enroll through another method, such as through a broker.

In the past, some Colorado agents have complained about difficulties with getting credit for their efforts to help consumers enroll in PPACA exchange plans.

Connect for Health may be the only public exchange manager that posts data on the number of enrollments coming in through brokers and through the nonprofit assisters.

The exchange has enrolled 46,416 people through 1,595 certified brokers, and 9,658 through 678 health coverage guides and certified application counselors.

The brokers brought in an average of about 29 enrollees each. The nonprofit assisters averaged 14 enrollees each.

See also: Exchanges remember agents