The income umbrella (AP photo/Charles Dharapak)

In one sense, the holiday of Passover is probably a major cause of worker presenteeism.

I’m supposed to be making brisket for Passover next week, and it’s definitely hard for me to concentrate on work. All I can really think of is whether 275 degrees is the right oven temperature and whether my grandmother would approve of using organic ketchup and mustard in the basting sauce.

But, in another sense, Exodus — the part of the Bible that Passover is based on — is a great return-to-work document.

The tradition is that Aaron helped speak for Moses when Moses told the Pharaoh, “Let my people go!” because Moses had a speech impediment.

In other words: Moses had a disability, and his employer made reasonable accommodations so that he could do his job.

Of course, different people think different things about the Bible, but it certainly conveys a sense of how people were thinking about the world 2,500 to 3,500 years ago.

If people thought it was a good idea to make reasonable accommodations for workers thousands of years ago, maybe today’s employers could find ways to get their Americans with Disabilities Act compliance efforts up to Pharaonic Egypt snuff.

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