McDonald’s restaurants, America’s newest calorie-counter; Europe’s $640 billion rescue fund; the West Nile virus and the Fed is still trying to stimulate the economy. This and more in the Week in Pictures.  

McDonald’s USA Senior Director of Nutrition Cindy Goody, PhD, MBA, RD, LDN, reveals McDonald’s first-ever nutrition progress report, which measured the company’s nutrition performance over the past year, during a press conference on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012 in Washington. Among the company’s nutrition progress is a new Happy Meal launched in March 2012 which now automatically includes Apple Slices and a kids-size fry, as well as sodium reduction by more than 11 percent across its national core menu of food choices. (Larry French/AP Images for McDonald’s)

This handout photo provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration shows Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announcing the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, Monday, Sept. 10, 2012, at the National Press Club in Washington. The report is a new look at the first National Strategy for Suicide Prevention first issued ten years ago. (AP Photo/John Harrington, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)

German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures during her speech at the budget debate of the German Federal Parliament, Bundestag, in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. Germany’s highest court paved the way on Wednesday for the creation of Europe’s 500 billion euro (US $640 billion) permanent rescue fund, rejecting calls to block it in a long-awaited ruling that caused investors to breathe a sigh of relief. The Federal Constitutional Court’s decision clears the way for German President Joachim Gauck to ratify the fund, the European Stability Mechanism. Jean-Claude Juncker, who chairs meetings of the 17-nation euro area’s finance ministers, said he planned to convene the first meeting of the fund’s board of governors on Oct. 8. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

In this photo taken Wednesday Carlos Kuk serves first courses during dinner at the Blue Plate restaurant in San Francisco. Nearly 200 San Francisco businesses charge diners and other customers an extra fee to pay for employee health care, but millions of dollars of it never gets spent on doctor visits or medicine. An Associated Press analysis of city records shows 59 percent of businesses that impose health care surcharges of about 3 per cent to 5 per cent on their clientele collected an average of $61,000 more than they spent on health care last year. Blue Plate suspended the fee because many of the young, healthy employees didn’t have many medical expenses. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Health officials warned this week that this will be the most dangerous year for West Nile virus deaths since the disease first came to the US in 1999. 

In a handout photo from the state’s governors office, Gov. Rick Snyder announces sweeping changes to how Michigan’s largest health insurance provider is regulated during a press conference in Lansing, Mich., Tues. Sept. 11. 2012. Snyder called for Blue Cross to become a nonprofit mutual insurance company that is regulated under the Michigan Insurance Code like all other health insurers in the state. State Department of Community Health Director Jim Haveman, left, and other officials were on hand for the announcement. (AP Photo/Michigan Governor’s Office, HO)

Trader Warren Meyers reacts to the announcement of the Federal Reserve as he watches a television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. The Federal Reserve unleashed a series of aggressive actions Thursday intended to stimulate the still-weak economy by making it cheaper for consumers and businesses to borrow and spend. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)