Fed officials extend a program designed to keep long-term rates down, another black eye for Goldman Sachs, Greece tries to make some progress and the country anxiously awaits The Supreme Court’s health care decision. This and more in this week’s Week in Pictures. 

The decision of the Federal Reserve is visible on a television monitor at the trading post of specialist Michael Guli, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday, June 20, 2012. The Federal Reserve is extending a program designed to drive down long-term interest rates to spur borrowing and spending. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Evangelos Venizelos, the head of the Socialist PASOK party leaves after a press conference following his meeting with leader of the New Democracy conservative party Antonis Samaras in Athens, on Wednesday, June 20, 2012. The three parties that back Greece’s commitments to bailout creditors have agreed in principle to form a coalition government and are negotiating the final details, officials said Wednesday. The agreement follows protracted negotiations between the conservative New Democracy party, the Socialist PASOK and the smaller Democratic Left party, after a national election on Sunday. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn speaks at the Governor’s Mansion in Springfield, Ill., Thursday, June 14, 2012. Quinn signed into law Thursday a $1.6 billion Medicaid spending cut that takes a bite out of a relatively generous program and will leave the state with a level of services already familiar elsewhere in the nation. The new cuts to the health care safety-net program eliminate extras like chiropractic and dental care for adults. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

Smoke curls around a cigar as a smoker enjoys a cigar at a shop in Richmond, Va., Wednesday, June 20, 2012. The Food and Drug Administration intends to regulate cigars under a 2009 law that gave it authority over the tobacco industry and cigar makers and aficionados are pushing to ensure their livelihoods and the products they enjoy. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Ora Botwinick performs a pre-natal exam on Maria de Lourdes at the Multnomah County’s North Portland Health Center Monday, June 18, 2012, in Portland, Ore. No matter what the U.S. Supreme Court decides about the future of the federal health care law, Gov. John Kitzhaber’s ambitious Medicaid overhaul will go forward, state officials said Monday. But if the court throws out the entire federal law not just the most controversial parts officials said the ruling could jeopardize a new health insurance exchange, a marketplace where individuals and small business can shop for coverage starting in 2014. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Former Goldman Sachs director Rajat Gupta, left, and his attorney Gary P. Naftalis, leave federal court in New York, Friday, June 15, 2012. Gupta, accused of feeding confidential information to a corrupt hedge fund manager, has been convicted of conspiracy and three counts of securities fraud. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

This March 22, 2012, file photo, shows the Supreme Court in Washington. A new poll finds that Americans overwhelmingly want the president and Congress to get to work on a new bill to change the health care system if the Supreme Court strikes down President Barack Obama’s 2010 law as unconstitutional. That doesn’t seem to be in either party’s plans on the verge of the high court’s verdict on the law that was aimed at extending health insurance to more than 30 million Americans who now lack coverage. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)