50. Free prize.

Invite clients to bring friends to a fun function, such as an outing at a driving range or a putting contest at a local golf club. Include their kids or grandkids in the event and offer a free prize or two, such as gift cards or iPod shuffles. Make a short, informative presentation on principal protection and income tax advantaged products and you’re sure to make a few new friends and clients. (Bonus tip: Include a carrier of the product you prefer on your guest list, and they are likely to sponsor your event or contribute funds to pay for the prizes and other expenses.)

Michael Ham

49. Keep it simple.

Just ask. Ask the question and listen to the response and offer to help.

—Arlo Clemens

48. Personal note.

After I meet a prospect, whether I make a sale or not, I send them a personalized card thanking them for their valuable time. I usually include something personal I learned about them. If the prospect has become a client, I send a “welcome to the family” type of card. I then send them at least four cards a year, one on their birthday, and three others on random holidays. On the random cards, I like to add a nice scenic picture of somewhere I have been on vacation … it shows them they are more than just a client. I find between the personal services I offer (like answering my cell phone even If I am skiing in the Alps) and the extra attention I give to them, I retain 99.9 percent of my clients, and I get a ton of work off referrals.

—Marc A. Figlar

 

47. The Medicare market.

My primary business comes from this market. I send a follow up letter to all of my clients quarterly thanking them for their business and also reminding them that if they know of anyone who needs help sorting through all of the choices available, I am willing to help. My goal is to get one new client from each of my current clients.

—S. Kangas

Continuing Education

46. Continuing education.

Earn a Chartered Advisor for Senior Living (CASL) designation. Advanced education can help you be more successful in serving the needs of your senior client and the CASL is the most comprehensive program available.

—Eric B. Gordon

45. Something shiny and new.

Always be looking for something new to offer your client, like a new product or strategy. If you don’t have anything new to show them, there’s no reason for them to see you. They’ll be seeing someone else instead.

—Steve Brock

 

44. Mind the gap.

I stay in contact with all of my clients by telephone, mail and email. I bring them up to date on their policy particulars. I compare the benefit amount with the going amount in the local area, and sometimes they ask about getting another policy to fill the gap.

—Katharine Jacobson

43. Follow up!

Sometimes the client is not always ready to buy or it was not the right time. What I have found is that less successful agents that did not get the sale on the first visit do not follow up, and there is low hanging fruit with a follow up call and/or visit even two, three or six months later. I create email blasts and letter mailings that will prompt an old client to call.

—Kevin Cornell

Outside the Box

42. Outside the box.

I had a client that was going to add funds to a non-qualified annuity that was earning about 3 percent. She had no intention of using this money and ultimately would pass it on to her daughter. I explained to her how we could use life insurance to create a tax-free death benefit that would go to her daughter upon her death. We took $50,000 and created in excess of $88,000 of death benefit overnight. My client never thought she could get life insurance at age 84. We have to think outside the box and ask questions in order to provide the best service for clients.

—Eric Van Shore

41. No alpha dog.

When waiting at the door for the client to arrive, turn to the side and look away instead of peering into the home, so the client sees you first. When they arrive, take one step back to show deference. It works.

—Claude Peltz

For more sales & marketing tips, see LifeHealthPro’s 100 Best Sales & Marketing Ideas Ever.