“Health is the true wealth” and other images from the worlds of medical, disability and long-term care insurance.

Informal memorials to Steve Jobs

You can’t take it with you, no matter how beautifully you’ve packaged it: Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple Inc. and Pixar, died Oct. 5 at 56. He had admirers by the millions, including the admirers who created this memorial in front of the Apple store in Boston. He had billions of dollars in monetary wealth. But, in the end, cancer took a truly priceless asset — his life. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Sen. Patty Murray

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., leaves at the end of a closed-door Democratic caucus luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington. She is part of the 12-member Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction – the  “Super Committee” — that is racing to come up with $1.2 trillion in deficit reduction proposals by Thanksgiving. She and her colleagues could try to wring hundreds of billions of the savings from Medicare, Medicaid and the doctors, hospitals, health insurers and other vendors that work with those programs. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The Kalleys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this May 26, 2011 photo provided by Terry Kalley, Kalley and his wife, Arlene, are seen at their home in Troy, Mich. Blue Chielf of California, San Francisco, says it may limit access to coverage for new prescriptions for Avastin for patients with breast cancer Oct. 17, because a U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel has decided that the benefits of taking the drug do not justify the risks for most breast cancer patients. The Kalleys believe the drug works and are trying to keep Avastin benefits in place. California Blue Shield says it will continue benefits for patients already receiving the drug and may make exceptions in individual cases. (AP Photo/Terry Kalley)

Eye doctors fight for pediatric eye care benefits in EHB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A panel at the Institute of Medicine, Washington, released a report Friday that is supposed to help U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius design the “essential health benefits” (EHB) package that is supposed to be at the heart of the major medical plans offered through a new system of health insurance exchanges starting Oct. 14, 2014. The EHB is supposed to keep carriers from undercutting competitors by watering down benefits. Interest groups are girding to fight the benefits of interest to their members. The American Academy of Ophthalmology, along with the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, was out front battling for basic benefits packages to include vision care benefits for children. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Prostate surgery

In this Sept. 13 photo provided by the University of Chicago Medical Center, Dr. Gautam Jayram assists during prostate cancer surgery, watching an internal video of the patient’s body, at the University of Chicago Medical Center in Chicago. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force sparked a controversy Friday by concluding that it sees no clear evidence that routine prostate-specific antigen blood tests help the men who get the tests. Critics say the tests save lives; panel supporters are pointing to the recommendation as an example of the need for careful evidence-based assessments of treatment and screening test recommendations. (AP Photo/University of Chicago Medical Center, Bruce Powell)