Climbing fuel prices may create an opportunity to encourage workers to think about budgeting.

ComPsych Corp., Chicago, an employee assistance program (EAP) company, has talked about the effects of gas prices on workers’ thinking in a summary of results of a survey of EAP enrollees who contacted ComPsych assistance programs.

About 41% said they have responded to rising gas prices by driving less or combining trips, and 22% said they have cut spending in other areas, such as spending on groceries, entertainment or clothing, ComPsych says.

Another 13% said they have canceled or put off vacations or other trips.

The answers to the survey suggest that employees are more interested in budgeting and are looking for ideas about ways to offset the higher gas prices, according to ComPsych Chairman Dr. Richard Chaifetz.

- Allison Bell

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