In response to “GOP budget would restructure Medicare
I’ve paid into Medicare for my entire life and now see the government wastes those dollars instead of investing them. Having seniors pay a premium for coverage is outrageous. Everyone over 65 should be exempt and current coverage continued under any changes. Republican representatives be warned: You will lose the election in 2012 if you do not change the concept you are presenting.
-Earl P.

In response to “Getting across the bridge: Asking for referrals
I send a thank you letter or postcard to all of my clients and prospects several times a year and close with a “P.S.–I love referrals and please do not keep me a secret. Thanks.” Or, I’ll write: “If I can be of service to someone you know please do not keep me a secret. I love referrals.” By using this method we avoid the embarrassment of being turned down.
-Wayne Cunningham

In response to “IRS alert: The tax advantages of annuities
The article makes a lot of good points. Too bad the investment brokers, consumer advocates, and the government do not see it the same way.
-Tom Michaels

In response to “AARP subject of Republican ‘witch hunt’
AARP made a big mistake in championing Obama health care before Congress had even read the bills. They shouldn’t have done it. As to Medicare Advantage Plans, they are wrong again. People with Advantage Plans also pay for Medicare Part B monthly like everybody else. Our poor are still paying an average of $3,950 per year for out-of-pocket maximums with an Advantage Plan.

The difference is that from the perspective of a Medicare Supplement Plan, instead of paying a premium of $2,000 per year for the supplement, they pay copays as they go. We all should be paying for what we use, not just for the fact of having supplemental coverage. Whoever wrote this doesn’t understand it, and neither does AARP.
-Sandra A. Malone

In response to “The 100 best sales & marketing ideas
This may be old-fashioned, but it works for me. Everyone has windshield or commute time going to and from sales. Carry a tape recorder in your vehicle and when a thought comes to mind, record it. It could be something such as another question you should have asked at the interview, a new prospect you just thought of, a new sales idea–whatever. Play it back when you get to the office. You will be surprised by the inspiration it will give you.
-R. Heppner