In response to “Ideas for cultivating your ‘A’ clientele
These are all great ways to cultivate your relationship with your clients and will help you become more referable. Here are two more: 1) Follow up after each meeting with a personalized “thank you” card highlighting the goals your client wants to achieve. 2) If you know a client or a member of their family is sick, send a “get well” card. Even better, follow up in a week to see how they are doing. In a service economy, it is all about the experience. Small acts of kindness will go a long way and make a lasting impression.
-Norm Trainor

Great sales tips. I would add: Ask your ‘A’ clients for a referral. They will be glad to help, and you will strengthen your relationship. They know people just like themselves. You will have a loyal client, and you’ll shorten your business-development process, increase production and talk to great sales prospects.
-Joanne Black

In response to “How to optimize your LinkedIn profile
It is true that you can optimize for keywords within LinkedIn that can help you get discovered, but there a couple of caveats to this. First of all, your ranking is also influenced by the number of connections you have and the number of recommendations you have (which most advisors can’t showcase due to the regulatory environment). Second, the truth is that most people don’t search for terms like “Dallas financial advisor” unless they don’t already have an advisor or don’t have any friends and family who recommend advisors to them.

Instead, financial advisors should try to optimize for keywords more centered on their areas of expertise, in my opinion. I think the most important factors with regard to a financial advisor LinkedIn profile is to have a professional image associated with your profile (still hard to believe how many have no image), and complete your profile to the extent that you can given your firm’s policies.
-Stephanie Sammons

In response to “Health care reform gets nasty
The battle isn’t between the Obama administration and the health insurance industry. The real battle is between morality, ethics and fairness enforced by the administration and greedy health insurance
companies that strive to maintain their status quo of insensitivity towards their victims of prey–the population at large. Delaying payments to doctors and hospitals, reducing agents’ compensation and renewals, denying claims and cutting benefits while increasing premiums, those are just a few of the reckoning approaches used by the greedy carriers to keep their untouchable position, while steering the mis-informed population against the health care reform.
-O.R.