A reader of my “To Your Good Health” column recently wrote to discuss his concern about what he believes to be the systemic disaster that will ensue from PPACA. He wondered about what deals the government may have cut with the insurance carriers and the pharmaceutical industry.

Both groups were indeed early visitors to the White House, but there is another group that may have had an even more profound effect on the ultimate fate of the legislation. The American Medical Association supported the bill, and their support was played like a Stradivarius.

Over the years, the AMA has held a revered and honored place in America. Among certain generations of Americans, doctors are deified, so it is unsurprising that the AMA’s support likely carried significant weight. As one tragically uninformed friend told me, “If the doctors are in favor of this, it must be OK.”

Various legislative and executive branch proponents were fond of reminding us that the “majority” of doctors supported their plan. Yet the AMA represents less than a third of licensed U.S. doctors. Even among that fraction, the discussion of this issue at their convention was reportedly rancorous and divisive.

The best AMA President J. James Rohack, MD, could offer at a press conference was, “The bill isn’t perfect, but we can’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good,” – hardly the sterling endorsement that was portrayed by the lamestream media.

Today, a group of thousands of physicians known as Docs 4 Patient Care is posting extremely pointed letters in their waiting rooms. Their goal is to rally support for those midterm candidates who would repeal PPACA. The letter’s call to action states: “Please remember when you vote this November that unless the Democratic Party receives a strong negative message about this power grab our health care system will never be fixed and the doctor patient relationship will be ruined forever.”

It seems the endorsement anesthesia is wearing off, and many doctors don’t like what they see in their future.

Check out more blog entries from David Saltzman.