Boomers worried about paying for health care in retirement should take note. As boomers begin hitting 65 next year, Medicare will be under increasing strain. A new report by Sg2, a health care information company, found that health care providers will have to reduce costs by 14 percent, or $1,082 per case, just to “break even” if they’re paid at today’s rates.

“The health care leader of the future must recognize incremental and long-term cost saving strategies today, while still delivering cost-effective, quality care,” Michael Sachs, chairman and CEO of Sg2, said in a press release.

Sachs added that providers of all sizes must understand the financial implications of the swelling Medicare population, and urged providers to create a clinically integrated framework.

“Now is the time to implement a disease-centered approach that not only uncovers financial opportunities, but addresses clinical performance across both inpatient and outpatient settings.”

According to the Census Bureau of the more than 78 million boomers, 11.3 million were uninsured in 2008, the most recent data available.

The American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance recently found that long-term care is more affordable than many people believe. Over 43 percent of people under 61 pay less than $1,499 per year for long-term care. Costs jump dramatically for older policy holders; over 73 pay more than $1,500 and nearly 15 percent pay more than $4,000.