A government-run public option may no longer be in the cards for the health care system overhaul. According to Shailagh Murray and Lori Montgomery of the Washington Post , Democratic Senate negotiators were able to come to a compromise regarding the controversial government-run insurance plan. The deal would mean dropping the plan from the health care bill before it goes in for a final vote.

Hoping to move the initiative forward before the holidays, five liberals and five moderates sat down to negotiate the differences between the two main opinions on the public option. After six days, the tentative decision to drop the plan from the bill came in an effort to remove one of the last major obstacles to getting it passed.

The compromise states that the original government-run plan would be replaced with “a program that would create several national insurance policies administered by private companies but negotiated by the Office of Personnel Management, which oversees health policies for federal workers.” If approved national policies were problematic to reach, a government plan would be implemented.

Another stipulation of the negotiations would be that people as young as 55 would be allowed to purchase Medicare. Additionally, private insurance companies would come under the microscope, facing strict new policies, including, “a requirement that they spend at least 90 cents of every dollar they collect in premiums on medical services for their customers.”