America’s Health Insurance Plans’ new ongoing training course for LTCI/LTC partnerships is rolling out! As we have been reporting, in many states the focus is now shifting to ongoing LTCI training, required by most states every two years after the initial training. AHIP has developed a four-hour course to meet this requirement and submitted it to the states for approval. We have already received approvals from 15 states and expect about 10 more in the next few weeks. This course is available on our Web site (www.LTCPartnershipsOnline.com), and classroom training is already being conducted in some states

AHIP’s ongoing training course not only provides a comprehensive review of LTCI and LTC partnerships, it brings agents up-to-date on new LTCI product features and designs, market trends, long-term care costs, and regulatory developments. This is the course to take for both a solid understanding of our field and an up-to-the-minute briefing on current trends.

In this article, we discuss the federal-state “Own Your Future” long-term care awareness campaign and the opportunity it offers to LTCI agents. And as always, we provide current information on the training requirements and regulatory developments in all 50 states.

A national long-term care awareness campaign

Many people don’t think about the possibility that they may need long-term care at some point, so they don’t take steps to prepare for it. But the more a person knows about long-term care, the likelihood of needing it, and how much it costs, the more likely he or she is to plan ahead. And this not only benefits the person and his or her family, it also has an impact on public policy. More people planning for LTC can mean more private financing and a reduced burden on public funding. This is especially critical to state governments at this time, given the serious budget and fiscal challenges they face.

The “Own Your Future” Long-Term Care Awareness Campaign (OYF) was created to address this situation. Its goal is to increase consumer knowledge and understanding and encourage planning. The campaign is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and implemented by participating states. It is a unique partnership in which the federal and state governments join together to spread a consistent message about long-term care planning.

Now in its fifth year, the OYF campaign has reached over 20 million homes in 19 states. This summer Colorado, the District of Columbia, Iowa and Kentucky are joining the initiative.

A state campaign

What happens when a state conducts an “Own Your Future” campaign? It sends residents ages 45 to 65 materials designed, tested and approved by DHHS. These include a letter from the governor and a tri-fold brochure. The brochure explains how to order (by phone, mail or online) an easy-to-read Long-Term Care Planning Tool Kit.

The Tool Kit contains a 28-page brochure that describes long-term care and explains the value of planning (including possibly purchasing long-term care insurance), plus an audio CD with interviews of persons engaged in several different types of planning activities.

In some states, a follow-up postcard is sent. Also, a public service announcement is available that can be customized with an introductory message from a state’s governor.

What can agents do?

The OYF campaign educates consumers about various ways of planning for long-term care, but long-term care insurance is an important component, and this can have a positive impact on the efforts of LTCI agents. In past state campaigns, agents report that sitting down to chat with a prospect who has received OYF materials helps to speed up the learning curve and can be an important underpinning of a successful sale. What is especially important is that the groundwork education has been provided by a neutral and trusted source — the state and federal government.

In addition, a state campaign can be an opportunity for agents to follow up with existing clients and reach out to new ones. You can call or write prospects, tell them about the campaign, and encourage them to order the Planning Kit or download it at http://www.longtermcare.gov/LTC/Main_Site/Planning_LTC/Campaign/Kit/index.aspx

The campaign also provides flyers that you can post or distribute at community meetings, and you can order copies of the brochure to give out. (Available, while supplies last, at http://www.longtermcare.gov/LTC/Main_Site/Planning_LTC/Campaign/Bulk_Order.aspx)

Agents in states currently launching their campaigns (Colorado, the District of Columbia, Iowa and Kentucky) in particular should take note of and participate in this important initiative.

However, while the OYF campaign welcomes the involvement of agents and insurers in getting out the LTC planning message, it is critical that the campaign’s sponsorship not be confused or compromised. Agents need to be aware of the following requirements:

  • In any communications you have with clients related to the OYF campaign, you must not confuse the consumer about the source of the message.
  • You may not replicate the governor’s letter, and you may not distribute the letter as if it were coming to the consumer directly from the governor.
  • You may not include the DHHS or other federal or state logos on your sponsored communications, and you may not attach private logos of any kind to the letter from the governor or any other OYF materials.
  • You can encourage prospects to order the Planning Kit and follow up with them afterwards, but you cannot provide the kit to them directly.

Results

Based on results to date, the “Own Your Future” campaign appears to be making a difference in raising awareness and encouraging people to begin planning ahead for their LTC needs. Of those who have received the governor’s letter and brochure, from 5.3% to over 20% have ordered the Planning Kit, greatly exceeding typical direct mail response rates. And those who get the Planning Kit are much more likely to take some type of planning action than those who do not.

  • They are about twice as likely to review their existing insurance coverage to determine whether it meets long-term care needs.
  • They are also about twice as likely to talk to an agent or financial planner about their future long-term care needs.
  • They are three times as likely to buy long-term care insurance.

The “Own Your Future” campaign is having a significant impact on the awareness of individuals and the planning they do, and it provides excellent support for agents seeking to educate consumers about long-term care and how to provide for it.

For more details on OYF campaign activities and results, please consult:

http://www.longtermcare.gov/LTC/Main_Site/Planning_LTC/Campaign/index.aspx

http://www.longtermcare.gov/LTC/Main_Site/Planning_LTC/Campaign/Reports/Documents/2005/Phase%20I%20Results.pdf

http://www.longtermcare.gov/LTC/Main_Site/Planning_LTC/Campaign/Reports/Documents/2006/Phase%20I%20Consumer%20Survey.pdf

Training Deadlines

A reminder of recent deadlines for completion of initial training:

  • June 30, 2009 — Arizona
  • July 1, 2009 — Arkansas*, Illinois*, New Jersey*, South Carolina, Tennessee*, Washington*, and West Virginia (new agents only)
  • July 14, 2009 — Oklahoma*

* The deadline is for existing LTCI agents; new agents in these states had to complete the initial training before selling policies. For details, see state reports below.

State reports

Note: California, Connecticut, Indiana and New York have had long-term care partnership programs in operation for several years and are often referred to as the “original partnership” states. These programs are in many ways different from the new partnerships currently being established in other states in response to the federal Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005. Their training requirements do not follow the NAIC model created to implement the DRA and adopted by most new partnership states. Therefore, agents who take training based on the NAIC model will not meet the requirements of the four original states, and those who take partnership training in one of the original states will not meet the requirements of the new states (although in some cases reciprocity may be granted anyway).

Check with your carrier!

We would like to remind agents that some states do not review and approve courses as meeting their LTCI/LTC partnership training requirements. In these states, it is up to the carrier to decide whether a course fulfills the state requirements. And in all states, carriers must track agents’ completion of the required training. So in seeking to meet state training requirements, always check with the carrier or carriers you represent.

Alabama. All LTCI agents must complete an eight-hour initial training course. The course must be based on the NAIC model (no state-specific content required) and approved by the state for long-term care CE credits. Courses approved for general CE do not fulfill this requirement, even if they address long-term care and have “long-term care” in the title. (AHIP’s course is approved for LTC and fulfills the requirement.) Agents already licensed for LTCI before March 1, 2009, have until December 31, 2009, to complete the initial training; new agents (those not already licensed before March 1, 2009) must complete the initial training before selling LTCI. Agents are also required to complete four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Alaska. No action to establish an LTC partnership has been reported, and the state currently has no agent training requirements specific to long-term care insurance.

Arizona. As of June 30, 2009, all LTCI producers must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI. Producers must also complete four hours of ongoing training during each 24-month period beginning July 1, 2009, after the 24-month period in which they completed the initial training.

Arkansas. As of July 1, 2009, all LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training before selling LTCI. The content of this training is based on the NAIC model plus a state-issued supplement on the Arkansas partnership and Medicaid programs. Agents must also complete four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

California is one of the original partnership states (see note above). Before selling partnership policies, agents must complete eight hours of general long-term care training and eight hours of training specific to the California LTC partnership. The partnership-specific training must be received in a classroom setting. In addition, eight hours of ongoing classroom partnership training must be taken during every two-year license approval period.

Colorado. All resident LTCI agents must complete 16 hours of initial training before selling LTCI. This training must include the topics of the NAIC model plus substantial additional content, as stipulated by the state. Eight hours must cover long-term care and long-term care insurance and can be classroom, self-study, or Internet-based; the other eight hours must focus on partnership and must be classroom training. Agents must also complete five hours of ongoing training (classroom only) during every 24-month CE period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Nonresident agents can sell LTCI (including partnership policies) in Colorado without fulfilling the above requirements if all of the following conditions are met:

  • Their home state has an LTC partnership.
  • They meet their home state’s training requirements for partnership policies (even if the state requires less than 16 hours or its rules otherwise differ from Colorado’s).
  • They hold a Colorado nonresident license for life insurance or accident and health insurance.

If a nonresident agent’s home state does not have a partnership, the agent must fulfill Colorado’s requirements, even if she meets the home state’s requirements for nonpartnership LTCI. If the home state has a partnership but the agent meets the training requirements only for nonpartnership LTCI policies, she must fulfill Colorado’s requirements.

Connecticut is one of the original partnership states (see note above). To sell partnership policies, an agent must complete first a prerequisite online course approved by the partnership program and then four hours of classroom instruction conducted by partnership program staff.

Delaware. No action to establish an LTC partnership has been reported. To sell LTCI, an agent must meet the training requirements for a health insurance license and also, every two years, complete a three-hour course in LTCI approved by the state.

District of Columbia. No action to establish an LTC partnership or new LTCI training requirements has been reported. Currently there are no training requirements specific to LTCI — an agent must simply be licensed to sell life and health insurance.

Florida. At present, all LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI policies. Agents must also complete four hours of ongoing training every 24 months, beginning on the date they completed the initial training. In addition, the state is currently developing a rule under which agents will have to complete two hours of Florida-specific training (on the state’s Medicaid and partnership programs and its regulations), either as part of the initial eight-hour training or in addition to it. (This rule is expected to be finalized soon, but it is not yet in effect.)

Georgia. Agents intending to sell partnership policies (not all LTCI agents) must complete initial training before selling. The initial training consists of the NAIC model plus two hours of state-specific content, for a total of eight hours. Georgia resident agents who have already taken the training required to sell partnership policies in another state may receive up to six hours credit for that training and need to take only the two hours of Georgia-specific training. Nonresident agents who are qualified to sell partnership policies in their home state need to take only the Georgia-specific training.

Agents selling partnership policies must also take four hours of ongoing training during every two-year license renewal period, which runs from Jan. 1 to Jan. 1. The first ongoing training must be completed by the second Jan. 1 after completion of the initial training. To give some examples: Mary Jones completed the initial training on Oct. 14, 2008; she has until Jan. 1, 2010, to complete the first ongoing training. Bob Smith completes the initial training on Feb. 6, 2009; he has until Jan. 1, 2011.

Hawaii. In 2007, the legislature passed a bill requiring all LTCI agents to complete eight hours of training based on the NAIC model. But this requirement will not go into effect until the state’s partnership program is established, and it is unclear when that might happen — a partnership bill failed to pass in the 2008 and 2009 legislative sessions but may be reintroduced in 2010. The bottom line for agents: There are no partnership training requirements in effect at this time; there will be no such requirements until the partnership is established; and when that occurs, agents will have one year from that date to complete the training.

Idaho. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI products. They must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Illinois. As of July 1, 2009, all LTCI agents must complete course 25008. To be approved by the state as 25008, a course must cover the NAIC content and provide at least eight hours of instruction. (AHIP’s NAIC Model Course is approved.) Agents must also complete four CE credits in long-term care during each 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Indiana is one of the original partnership states (see note above). To sell LTCI, agents must take eight hours of initial training and five hours of ongoing training every two years. To sell partnership policies, agents must also take seven hours of partnership training (classroom only). Agents licensed in another state are exempt from the general LTCI requirement, but to sell partnership policies they must receive the seven hours of Indiana partnership training.

Iowa. All LTCI agents must complete initial training before selling LTCI. This initial training is based on the NAIC model but is only four hours, not the usual eight. AHIP offers Iowa agents its eight-hour NAIC Model Course, as we believe it best meets their needs. This course fulfills the state’s requirement, and it gives Iowa agents the opportunity to earn additional CE credits and qualify to sell LTCI in other states. (Iowa agents who take a four-hour Iowa course will not be able to qualify in most other states without taking an eight-hour NAIC model course.) Iowa agents must also take three hours of ongoing training during every three-year CE term.

Kansas. Training requirements have recently been approved. Effective July 1, 2010, agents selling partnership policies (not all LTCI agents) must complete four hours of initial training. Partnership agents must also take one hour of ongoing training during every two-year license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training. In both cases, courses must be certified for partnership training by the Commissioner of Insurance.

Kentucky. The state’s LTC partnership and related regulations are now in effect, and partnership policies are expected to be available soon. Agents intending to sell partnership policies (not all LTCI agents) must complete eight hours of initial training before selling. This initial training must cover the topics of the NAIC model as well as certain Kentucky-specific content stipulated by the state. Agents selling partnership products must also take four hours of ongoing training during each 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training. Note that although the state requires only agents selling partnership policies to receive this training, it is expected that many carriers will require all agents to take it. Nonresident agents who meet the partnership training requirements of their home state will not be required to meet Kentucky’s requirements.

Louisiana plans to submit to the federal government in a few months a state plan amendment (SPA) seeking authorization to establish an LTC partnership. Currently, there are no training requirements specific to long-term care insurance; to sell LTCI, agents must be licensed to sell accident and health insurance.

Maine. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI. An agent must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month period beginning on the date he or she completed the initial training.

Maryland. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI. An agent must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month period beginning on the date he or she completed the initial training.

Massachusetts. No action to establish an LTC partnership or new LTCI training requirements has been reported. The state does not currently have training requirements specific to LTCI; the only requirement is that LTCI agents be licensed to sell accident and sickness insurance and meet continuing education requirements for accident and sickness. However, carriers are required to provide agents selling LTCI with training in the product.

Michigan. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the state are discussing issues involving Medicaid estate recovery, and this matter must be resolved before Michigan’s partnership program can be approved and related training requirements issued. Progress continues to be made, but final resolution has not yet been reached.

Minnesota requires resident agents to take a state-specific course before selling LTCI. It is eight hours and is based on the NAIC model, but state-specific information must be incorporated into the course (unlike in other states, where it can be added as a supplement). Nonresident agents can qualify to sell LTCI by taking an eight-hour NAIC model course in another state plus Minnesota-specific content. Agents must also take four hours of ongoing training every 24 months, beginning on the date the agent completed the initial training.

Mississippi. No action to establish an LTC partnership or new LTCI training requirements has been reported. Currently there are no training requirements specific to LTCI — an agent must simply be licensed to sell life, accident, and health insurance.

Missouri. Before selling partnership policies, agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. (State-specific content is not required, although the state strongly recommends that agents familiarize themselves with Missouri’s Medicaid and partnership programs, and AHIP’s course includes material on this.) Agents must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month license renewal/CE period after the period in which they completed the initial training. (These requirements do not apply to LTCI agents not selling partnership products.)

Montana. All LTCI agents must take eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI. Agents must also complete four hours of ongoing training every 24 months beginning July 1, 2008.

Nebraska. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training before selling LTCI. This initial training consists of the NAIC model plus state-specific information. Agents must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Nevada. The state has not and does not plan to issue specific partnership training requirements, such as minimum hours, topics to be covered, or deadlines, and it does not approve courses. Rather, the state requires insurers to certify that agents selling partnership policies meet the training standard of the federal Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) — that is, that they have “received training and demonstrated evidence of an understanding of the partnership policies and their relationship to public and private coverage of long-term care.” It is up to insurers to decide whether a course meets this standard, and consequently Nevada agents should consult with the carriers they represent and fulfill the training requirements of those companies.

New Hampshire has received federal approval of its LTC partnership program, and related state rules are currently being developed. These include proposed (but not final) training requirements under which producers selling partnership policies (not all LTCI producers) would have to complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before beginning to sell. Partnership producers would also have to take four hours of ongoing training every two years. We emphasize that these requirements are not yet final and subject to change.

New Jersey. As of July 1, 2009, all LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. Agents must also take four hours of ongoing training every 24 months. (The exact timeframe for the ongoing training is not specified by the state; insurers, who are responsible for ensuring agent compliance with the requirements, may use their own discretion.)

New Mexico has begun initial discussions on the establishment of an LTC partnership. Currently no special training is required to sell LTCI, only a health insurance license.

New York is one of the original partnership states (see note above). To sell partnership policies, agents must complete eight hours of training, consisting of a four-hour online course followed by four hours of classroom instruction.

North Carolina is currently taking steps to establish an LTC partnership. Presently, to sell LTCI an agent must have a license for health, accident, and sickness insurance and also a special Medicare supplement/long-term care (MS/LTC) license, which requires ten hours of training in these products and a state examination. When and if a partnership is established, the state will make a decision about adopting the NAIC training model for LTCI (eight hours of initial training and four hours of ongoing training every 24 months).

North Dakota. Before selling partnership policies, agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. Partnership agents must also take four hours of ongoing training every 24 months beginning July 1, 2008. These requirements do not apply to LTCI agents selling only non-partnership products.

Ohio. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training before selling LTCI. The content of the training is the NAIC model plus state-specific information. (Nonresident agents must have eight hours of training based on the NAIC model, but they are not required to have the state-specific content.) Agents must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month CE compliance period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Oklahoma. As of July 14, 2009, all LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. In addition, four hours of ongoing training are required during every 24-month license renewal period after the period in which the agent completed the initial training. Courses approved by the Oklahoma Insurance Department as meeting the initial or ongoing training requirements also qualify for CE credit.

Oregon. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI. Agents must also complete four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month period beginning the date they completed the initial training.

Pennsylvania. In 2007, the state established partnership training requirements, which have been in effect since. Then in 2008 the state proposed a new rule with additional requirements. This proposed rule is currently going through the regulatory review and approval process and is expected to be finalized sometime this year. In the meantime, the 2007 requirements remain in effect.

  • Rule in effect: Agents intending to sell partnership policies (not all LTCI agents) must, before selling, complete a one-hour course on the Pennsylvania Medicaid program based on state-issued content. This requirement will continue to apply after the new proposed rule goes into effect.
  • Proposed rule: All LTCI agents (not just those selling partnership policies) will have to complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. (These eight hours may include the one-hour state-specific course cited above or be taken in addition to it.) Agents will be given time to fulfill this new requirement after it becomes effective, but a deadline has not been set. In addition, all LTCI agents will have to complete four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month licensing cycle after the cycle in which they complete the initial training.

Rhode Island. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model before selling LTCI. An agent must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month period beginning the date he or she completed the initial training.

South Carolina. As of July 1, 2009, all LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training. This training is based on the NAIC model plus information on South Carolina’s Medicaid and partnership programs. An agent must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month period beginning the date he or she completed the initial training.

South Dakota. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training before selling LTCI. This training is based on the NAIC model plus state-specific information. Agents must also take four hours of ongoing training every 24 months beginning July 1, 2008.

Tennessee. As of July 1, 2009, all resident LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. Most resident agents must take an initial training course that includes information on Tennessee’s Medicaid and partnership programs. However, resident agents who took an eight-hour NAIC model course for another state before July 1, 2008, may use that course to meet the initial training requirement. (This exception is allowed so that Tennessee agents who took partnership training in another state before Tennessee established its partnership do not have to take the training again.)

Nonresident agents whose home state has a partnership can qualify in Tennessee by meeting the partnership training requirements of their home state. Nonresident agents from a nonpartnership state can qualify by taking an eight-hour NAIC model course, in Tennessee or another state.

Agents must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training. Agents exempt from general continuing education requirements (those who have been licensed continuously since Jan. 1, 1994) must take the initial training but are not required by the state to take the ongoing training (although carriers may require them to do so).

Texas. Partnership agents — that is, those intending to perform any of the acts of an agent in relation to long-term care partnership (LTC-P) insurance policies (not all LTCI agents) — must complete eight hours of initial training before selling. The content of this training is the NAIC model plus information on Texas Medicaid eligibility and asset disregard under the Texas partnership. Partnership agents also have to complete four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month licensing renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training. These requirements are not “grandfathered”–that is, no agent is exempt because he or she was already licensed for LTCI when the requirements were established.

Utah. Legislative action to establish an LTC partnership and new LTCI training requirements had been expected, but it now appears that this will not occur this year. Currently, there are no training requirements specific to long-term care insurance; LTCI agents must simply be licensed for accident and health insurance.

Vermont. The legislature has considered a bill establishing an LTC partnership, but final deliberation and a vote have been deferred until the 2010 legislative session. The legislature is currently considering a proposed regulatory rule that includes LTCI training requirements. If adopted, this rule would become effective January 1, 2010. The training requirements of the proposed rule are as follows: All LTCI agents will have to complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. All LTCI agents, both resident and nonresident, will have to complete two hours of training in state-specific information, with a focus on the Vermont Medicaid program; these two hours can be included in the eight-hour training or taken in addition to it. As for deadlines, agents already licensed to sell LTCI as of March 31, 2010, will have until March 31, 2011, to complete the initial training; agents licensed to sell LTCI after March 31, 2010, will have to complete the initial training before selling. Finally, all LTCI agents will have to take four hours of ongoing training every 24 months. We emphasize that these requirements are not yet final and may change.

Virginia. Agents intending to sell partnership policies (not all LTCI agents) must complete initial training before selling. These agents must also take four hours of ongoing training during every 24-month period beginning on the date they completed the initial training.

Most resident agents will have to take eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model plus state-specific information. However, agents who have previously completed six hours of CE credits in long-term care may be able to fulfill the initial training requirement by taking only a two-hour course focusing on partnerships and how they interact with public and private LTC coverage, including information specific to Virginia’s Medicaid program. The previous six hours must be approved for CE credit for long-term care and must have been completed on or after Jan. 1, 2007, but before the agent takes the two-hour course.

Nonresident agents must complete a two-hour course that includes information on Virginia’s Medicaid program, but they may be able to use LTCI training for another state to fulfill the remaining six-hour requirement (provided that training meets certain criteria).

Agents should contact the state to find out if their previous CE credits or nonresident training qualify. To meet the needs of all agents, AHIP offers both a two-hour and an eight-hour Virginia course.

Washington. New LTCI training requirements became effective Jan. 1, 2009, replacing earlier requirements. All LTCI producers must complete eight hours of initial training before transacting LTCI. As of July 1, 2009, even producers who previously completed the Washington LTC Special Education Course (6 hours) or the LTC Special Refresher Course (4 hours) must complete this eight-hour initial training. A producer must also take four hours of ongoing training every 24-month period beginning the date he or she completed the initial training

Both resident and nonresident producers can fulfill the initial training requirement by taking an eight-hour NAIC model course that meets the LTCI training requirements of another state. However, only those taking the Washington LTC Initial 8 Hour Course (which includes information on the state’s LTCI regulations) receive CE credit. (AHIP’s course is approved for this.)

West Virginia. A bill establishing LTCI training requirements was recently enacted and signed by the governor. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model. Agents already selling LTCI as of July 1, 2009, have until July 1, 2010, to complete this initial training; effective July 1, 2009, other agents have to complete the initial training before selling. Beginning July 1, 2010, agents will also have to take four hours of ongoing training during each 24-month CE period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Wisconsin. All LTCI agents must complete eight hours of initial training before selling LTCI. The content of the initial training is based on the NAIC model, but it must include two hours of Medicaid and partnership content specific to Wisconsin and developed and issued by the state. Agents who have already completed an eight-hour NAIC model course, or who take such a course in another state, can fulfill Wisconsin’s requirements by taking only the two hours of state-specific content. Agents also have to take four hours of ongoing training (including two hours of state-specific content) during every 24-month license renewal period after the period in which they completed the initial training.

Wyoming. On June 28, the federal government approved Wyoming’s state plan amendment establishing an LTC partnership effective July 1, 2009. The Department of Insurance will soon issue an administrative bulletin stipulating training requirements. All LTCI agents will have to take eight hours of initial training based on the NAIC model (no state-specific content required). Agents already selling LTCI as of July 1, 2009, will have until July 1, 2010, to complete the initial training; new agents will have to complete it before selling LTCI. Agents will also have to take four hours of ongoing training every 24 months.

IMPORTANT NOTE: States are currently developing and implementing their long-term care partnership programs and LTCI training requirements, and rules and regulations are in flux. The information in this newsletter is based on state-issued documents and informal communication with state personnel. It is current as of July 20, 2009, and subject to change.

This newsletter is intended for educational purposes only. Its contents are not a statement of policy on the part of AHIP or of its member companies. This newsletter is distributed with the understanding that AHIP is not engaged in rendering legal advice or other expert assistance. AHIP shall not be liable for any losses or damages claimed through the use of the information contained in this newsletter or relating to any potential inaccuracies of this information. For specific information on a state partnership program, the offices of the program should be contacted.