There seems to be a link between how well employees know their benefits and how motivated they are at work.

Unum Group Corp., Chattanooga, Tenn., reaches that conclusion in a summary of results from a recent Web survey of about 1,100 employed U.S. adults.

Participating workers who said they had received an excellent benefits education were more likely to feel valued by their employer, have a favorable view of their company and express a commitment to staying with their employer, even if they are offered the same pay and benefits elsewhere, Unum reports.

About 24% of the participating workers said their benefits education in the past year has been fair or poor.

One key to effective benefits education is to offer enough time to review benefits choices, Unum says. Employees who said they had more than 3 weeks to review benefits education materials were far more likely to say that they had enough time to make informed decisions than were those who were given less time.

Including voluntary benefits in the benefits package also appears to boost employee satisfaction, Unum says.