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20 Worst U.S. Cities for Retirement: 2021

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Related: 20 Best U.S. Cities for Retirement: 2021

Many Americans approaching the end of their working lives worry about how comfortably they will be able to live in retirement given their shaky financial situations. They often think their only option is to continue working.

In a new report, WalletHub suggests that an alternative is to relocate to an area where one’s dollar goes farther and also offers safety and access to good health care, among other features.

The research showed that U.S. cities run the gamut from ideal ones that provide sundry ways for people to spend their leisure time and also have good weather to those lacking many desirable characteristics.

WalletHub compared the retirement friendliness of 182 cities — including the 150 most populated U.S. cities, plus at least two of the most populated ones in each state — across the key dimensions of affordability, activities, quality of life and health care, and evaluated those dimensions across 48 metrics.

Researchers graded each metric on a 100-point scale, with a score of 100 representing the most favorable conditions for retirement. They then determined each city’s weighted average across all metrics to calculate its overall score and used the resulting scores to rank the sample. The sample considers only the city proper in each case and excludes cities in the surrounding metro area.

WalletHub notes that with cost being a significant factor in retirement, its analysis assumes retirees will rely on a fixed income. The lower their expenses, the better retirees will fare in a particular city.

See the gallery for the 20 worst cities for retirement in 2021.

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