The Financial Planning Association’s board reported Thursday that it had elected Martin Seay the 2019 FPA president-elect for a one-year term, starting Jan. 1.

Seay serves as the program director and associate professor of personal financial planning at Kansas State University, where he oversees and teaches in the CFP Board registered undergraduate, graduate certificate, master’s and Ph.D. programs.

The FPA also elected three new board members:

The 2019 board will comprise 14 members and FPA’s executive director and chief executive, Lauren Schadle.

FPA NextGen Picks New Leaders

FPA NexGen, a community that connects some 2,500 new financial planning professionals, announced Thursday the election of Alexandria Cole-Davis as 2019 president-elect and Joseph Stemmle as 2019 organizational director.

They will assume their positions on Jan. 1.

Cole-Davis, a financial paraplanner at Westlake, Grahl and Grover in Granite Bay, California, will help promote strategic efforts to support and advance the FPA NexGen community, according to a statement.

A recipient of numerous awards, she received her certificate in financial planning from the University of California, Davis Extension.

Stemmle, a financial advisor at Riverstone Wealth Advisory Group in Midlothian, Virginia, will help guide the FPA NexGen community’s strategic direction and seek opportunities to engage with new planners to encourage the sharing of ideas, the statement said.

Stemmle was educated at Virginia Commonwealth University’s business school.

“The process with which these candidates were selected was rigorous and intentional,” 2018 FPA NexGen president Ian Harvey, said in the statement. “As we look to the future of the profession, Alexandria and Joseph embody the qualities one would expect of leadership.”

FPA NexGen provides financial planning professionals who are new to the profession with a community that serves to support, advise and encourage professional advancement; promote, foster and direct programs that aid in knowledge transference; and explore issues common to relatively new planners in their career advancement.

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