25. (tie) Acting: $35,600 | 25. (tie) Health & Physical Education Teaching: $35,600

23. Sculpture: $35,500 | 22. Biblical Studies: $35,400

21. (tie) Educational Studies (ED): $35,400 | 21. (tie) Family Studies: $35,400

19. (tie) Human Ecology: $35,200 | 19. (tie) Therapeutic Recreation: $35,200

17. Paralegal Studies: $35,100 | 16. (tie) Early Childhood & Elementary Education: $35,000 | 16. (tie) Human Development & Family Studies: $35,000

14. (tie) Human Services (HS): $34,700 | 14. (tie) Wildlife & Fisheries Science: $34,700

12. Pastoral Ministry: $34,500 | 11. Social Work (SW): $34,000

10. Youth Ministry: $33,800 | 9. (tie) Bible Studies & Theology: $33,500 | 9. (tie) Christian Education: $33,500

7. Christian Ministry: $33,400 | 6. Printmaking: $32,400

5. Child Development: $32,300 | 4. Early Childhood Education: $32,100

3. Child & Family Studies: $32,000 | 2. Veterinary Technology: $31,800

1. Rehabilitation Services: $30,200

(Related: 20 Best Paying Jobs for College Business Majors: 2017)

If your expensive college degree can’t buy you money then hopefully it can buy you love — as in love of your career. So on the other end of ThinkAdvisor’s 30 Best Paying College Majors are college graduates that are paid the worst out of the 489 college majors in PayScale’s College Salary Report. Those low-paying majors, though, have a much higher percentage of people who feel their work makes the world a better place, aka love their jobs, so at least you have that when you’re eating your ramen noodles.

ThinkAdvisor culled the 25 worst paying college majors from PayScale’s Salary Report, which collected compensation data from 2.3 million employees working in the U.S. The online salary survey has information from 489 college majors, in this case just bachelor’s degrees. Starting salary was based on pay within the first 5 years after graduating.

The salary report comprises 1,532 of the 2,147 eligible bachelor’s degree granting colleges in the U.S. PayScale said survey respondents provided data about their jobs, compensation, employer, demographics and educational background.

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