Maximus Inc. (NYSE:MMS), a big government health plan administrator, sees state Medicaid long-term care (LTC) programs as a growth market.

The company is courting state health policymakers this week at a Council of State Governments (CSG) Medicaid policy meeting in Washington.

Organizers of the meeting have chosen LTC policy as the focus, and Barbara Selter, a Maximus vice president, will be participating in a panel discussion.

Maximus notes in a national press release about the appearance that it has been involved with nine of the 11 “dual eligibles” test programs, or programs to coordinate care for people who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid.

Maximus has also been active in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) public exchange services market.

See also: UnitedHealth unit wins R.I. exchange call center contractFeds OK Hawaii exchange plans and Maximus wins Connecticut exchange contract

Traditionally, Medicaid has paid for nursing home benefits for poor people.

Medicare has paid for home health care for older people with health problem, and skilled nursing facility care for enrollees recovering from conditions that led to hospitalization. But, in theory, Medicare has not paid for the kind of LTC services needed to help older people who are no longer able to handle the activities of daily living (ADLs).

Dual-eligibles programs have given Medicare program managers a way to get more involved with managing enrollees’ use of LTC services.

Bruce Caswell, president of Maximus, noted in a statement in the press release that only one-third of Americans ages 65 and older have enough financial assets to pay for even one year of nursing home services, and that 19 percent of the U.S. population is expected to be in that age category by 2030.

“Now is the time for states to address this anticipated increase in demand for long-term care services, by finding new approaches to strengthen performance and improve efficiencies within their current LTC programs,” Caswell said.