Close
ThinkAdvisor

Portfolio > Economy & Markets > Economic Trends

Keith Hall Named New CBO Director, Replacing Elmendorf

X
Your article was successfully shared with the contacts you provided.

Republican leaders of Congress named Keith Hall on Friday to serve as the new director of the Congressional Budget Office, replacing Doug Elmendorf.

Hall, who currently serves as chief economist for the International Trade Commission, will start his four-year term on April 1. Elmendorf, whose term officially expired on Jan. 3, will continue to serve as CBO director until the end of March.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said in a Friday statement after House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price, R-Ga., announced Hall’s selection, that Hall “brings with him a wealth of expertise on the economy and labor markets, as well as economic, fiscal and regulatory policy.”

Boehner thanked Elmendorf for his service, calling him “widely respected on both sides of the aisle” and “a true class act.”

Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., ranking member on the House Budget Committee, said that “Congress relies on CBO for nonpartisan, unbiased economic and budgetary analysis,” and that he hopes “Hall will continue that tradition of independent and professional leadership.”

CBO was established in 1975 to produce independent, nonpartisan analyses of economic and budgetary issues in support of the legislative budget process in Congress. While the agency plays a key role in analyzing the cost estimates for legislation proposed in Congress, it does not make policy recommendations.

Hall has previously served in leadership and management positions in the U.S. Treasury, the Commerce Department and the Executive Office of the President. He was the 13th commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Hall received his B.A. degree from the University of Virginia and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Purdue University. He has been a full-time faculty member of the economics departments at the universities of Arkansas and Missouri.

— Check out CBO Says Entitlements Will Cause Ballooning Deficits on ThinkAdvisor.