Reporters may be writing more about aging. (AP Photo/Kent Gilbert)

The Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) has added an aging “topic” that provides a collection of background materials and resource links aimed at reporters who cover health care.

The AHCJ has about 1,300 members.

“The aging of America, the most significant demographic trend of our time, has profound implications for health institutions, families, workplaces, communities, the economy, even the very concept of a normal life trajectory,” the creators of the page say in a topic overview.

“The health care implications are enormous, as seniors consume more medical care and account for a larger share of the nation’s health care spending than any other age group,” the site creators say. “Especially vulnerable are the ‘oldest old’ – people 85 and above, who tend to be more frail and have more significant medical needs. This group is expected to expand from 5.8 million people in 2010 to an estimated 19 million in 2050.”

Materials on the AHCJ’s site include a glossary, a collection of “key concepts,” tip sheets, and lists of links to collections of data and other aging-related resources.

The glossary defines “long-term care” as being “a range of medical, nursing, social, and community services designed to help people with chronic health impairments over an extended period of time.”

The glossary gives the following definition of “long-term care insurance”: “An insurance policy that covers long term care expenses in a facility or at home. Terms of policies differ widely.”

The tip sheets are articles in which the authors discuss the issues involved with covering topics such as caregiving, dementia and Medicaid.

Disclosure: Allison Bell is a member of the AHCJ.

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