30. The entire family.

While getting to know my senior clients I always get the names and numbers of their grown children and, with my client’s permission, I always invite their children to the closing and all of the subsequent annual reviews. Most children want to be involved with their parents’ finances to help protect them. So most of them will readily come to our appointments. Some advisors would prefer to work with just their senior clients, but I enjoy including the entire family, for all of the obvious reasons.

—Leon Hiracheta

 

29. Couple care.

When one half of a couple is likely to be declined for LTCI, I address the unhealthy one first. I explain how a medically underwritten immediate annuity can provide a life income much less expensively when life expectancy is less than “average.” The healthy one then easily agrees to buy LTCI leaving the nest egg for the unhealthy one to use. This results in future sales, as well as the medically underwritten annuity when the unhealthy one does need care.

—Romeo Raabe

28. Selling LTCI to affluent clients. 

It’s not about money with these clients; it’s about health care planning. Managing a care event takes more than money. Who is going to manage, monitor and adjust your loved one’s plan of care? Affluent clients connect to the idea of concierge health care. That’s what the personal care advocate in these policies do — he or she can assist in finding the right care, negotiating discounts on the client’s behalf and periodically ensuring the plan of care is being met.

—Steve Cain

 

Calling All Lawyers

27. Calling all lawyers.

I ask lawyers during the holiday season who they buy Christmas gifts for, and later ask for an introduction to those people. It is one of the best ways to get referrals from lawyers who are usually very reluctant to do introductions.

—Tunc Tanin

26. Walking and talking.

The old style of prospecting — that is walking and talking, handing out business cards, asking for referrals. It is an excellent social method with great results!

—John T. Corbin

25. Stand and deliver.

I always promise (and deliver) to show them the best plan for them, regardless of whether I can sell it to them or not. I have sent several potential clients to other carriers. And on several occasions, they have come back.

—Jim League

24. Where there’s a will …

I have found that many individuals and couples have not yet completed their necessary will, living will, health care power of attorney and durable power of attorney-related documents, and don’t fully understand the implications of not having these documents completed. Offering them an explanation of these documents and the importance of getting them completed is a way to built credibility and trust with potential clients.

—David Vanasse

Radio Guy23. Radio guy.

I host a weekly radio show addressing important issues in retirement and brand myself as the “Retirement Guy” in the Denver Metro Area. I find great success through a weekly call to action to request one of my free “Special Reports” mentioned in the radio show.

—Stephen Geist

22. Show you care.

While there are many technical skills that we need as advisors, the thing that rings in my mind is that we must be client-centric. People don’t care how much we know until they know how much we care. When I sit down with prospective clients, I spend at least two meetings with them (spaced a week apart for about two hours each) before I even let them give me a list of their assets.

—Kenny Main

21. The death plan?

Ask the clients that you are working with, “Have you made any death plans?” When you get the dubious glance, explain, “Many of my clients will have plans in place for when they are living, but very few discuss what the other spouse will do at the time of death.” This opens up opportunities for life insurance as well as annuity sales.

—Wendy Swanson

For more sales & marketing tips, see LifeHealthPro’s 100 Best Sales & Marketing Ideas Ever.