A new Kaiser Family Foundation poll finds that many Americans do not believe that Congress or private insurers will be able to keep Medicare solvent. There is no group with overwhelming support; however, a proposed independent panel of experts fairs better than the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Further findings indicate that 45 percent of respondents favor minor cuts to Medicare in order to reduce the federal deficit. Only 18 percent support major cuts toward this end. When asked about converting Medicare to a voucher program, Americans are split: 45 percent were in favor, while 49 were opposed.

Many Americans, especially seniors, are still unfamiliar with some provisions of the Affordable Care Act, but that has not prevented them from forming opinions about the legislation. Forty-two percent have a favorable view, and 46 percent have an unfavorable one.

The state of the national economy dominates respondents’ concerns. When asked what they want to hear about from presidential candidates, 60 percent said jobs and the economy, while only 26 percent said health care.

For more on Medicare, see:

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