Many U.S. families may need help talking about their finances.

Researchers at Ameriprise Financial Inc., Minneapolis, talk about financial communications weaknesses in a report on a survey of 1,001 boomers with $100,000 or more in investable assets; 300 parents of baby boomers; and 301 adult children of boomers.

About 48% of the affluent boomers said their parents gave them the message that money “should be openly discussed,” and 46 gave them the message that money is something that “you just don’t talk about,” the researchers write.

Only 39% of the boomer participants said they now talk with their families about money and finances on a regular basis.

Among boomers who talked with their parents about money growing up, 71% said they have talked with their parents recently about their parents’ current financial situation, and 47% said they have talked with their parents about their parents’ wishes for financial accounts.

Among boomers who rarely talked with their parents about finances when they were growing up, only 34% have talked much with their parents lately about their parents’ current financial situation, and only 33% have talked with their parents about their parents’ wishes for financial accounts.

More than 40% of boomers say they have not talked to their own adult children about important financial matters, such as wishes for financial accounts, mainly because they “haven’t gotten around to it.”