Old veteran slauting the flag. (Photo: Shutterstock)

This is ThinkAdvisor’s ninth annual Advisors Who Serve(d) compilation, in which we highlight stories of veterans in the advisory world, told in their own words.

This year was unusual, not just because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but also because we received more than 100 submissions from advisors. We suspect all of those who participated are working from home and have a little extra time, or desire, to dig into some of their memories in these unprecedented times.

Since we couldn’t fit all of them in here, we used just 37, though that is double what we normally publish. We promise to role out the rest over the Fourth of July and on Veterans Day.

So what is Advisors Who Serve(d)? Well, it’s just what it says: Financial advisors who have served or are serving in the military. Each year’s initial compilation has debuted over Memorial Day weekend.

ThinkAdvisor understands that Memorial Day is meant for those who have died in battle serving in the military, not just for anyone who has served (honored on Veterans Day), or for those actively serving (recognized on Armed Forces Day).

ThinkAdvisor initially chose Memorial Day, since that’s when most of America focuses on the military and thus might pay extra attention to what we feel is an important compilation of stories.

This group is arranged in alphabetical order and numbered from 1-37, so you can keep track of advisors as you scroll through their stories, and maybe even recognize a few faces along the way.

(Check out our Advisors Who Serve(d) page to read stories by advisors from previous years.)


 Mark Amberg in uniform holding American flag.

1. Name: Mark E. Amberg

Title/Company: Wealth Management Advisor / First VP / Merrill Lynch Wealth Management

Branch: US Air Force / DC Air National Guard

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Airman Basic (E-1) thru Lt Colonel (O-5)

Service Dates:  1986 -2015

Work you did: Aircraft Electrician, Honor Guard, Maintenance Officer, Cyber Officer, Executive Officer, Commander

Brief story that stands out from your service time: There is no doubt that the most endearing part of being in the Air Force is serving with the caliber of people who can and will serve in the USAF.  As any student of air power knows, the men and women of early military aviation were ridiculed, misunderstood and even court martialed.  They are my heroes for their vision, tenacity and sacrifices.

As we approach Memorial Day, I seek to honor the legacy of the men and women who gave all for our nation. But I cannot remain silent on the battles our warriors fight silently, seemingly alone. The Veterans Administration reported that each year from 2008 to 2017, more than 6,000 veterans committed suicide. The rate for suicide among uniformed personnel is 50% higher than that of civilians. The reasons are not well understood, and infrequently discussed.  I will use Memorial Day to educate and encourage those around me to become aware and act within their communities.

 Scott Armacost in Navy uniform

2. Name: Scott Armacost

Title/Company: Financial Adviser / Cetera Advisors

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Ensign / Lt. Commander

Service Dates:  November 1982 – March 1994

Work you did: Division Officer, Department Head, Surface Warfare Officer

Brief story that stands out from your service time: On my first watch as Officer of the Deck, my ship was approaching one of the busiest chokepoints in the world in the middle of the night: the Straits of Malacca. I reported a bright light on the horizon directly in front of us and asked our radar operators to “Mark the Contact” and keep an eye on it. They quickly reported that no such contact appeared on radar and yet, I could see the light growing larger and brighter by the minute. I called out on the Bridge-to-Bridge radio for the contact dead ahead of us to identify herself and state her intentions. Nothing. I tried again.

Nothing — and nothing on radar either. Fearing the possibility of a head-on collision with one of the many 100,000-ton cargo vessels in the area, I called the captain (who was sound asleep) and requested his presence on the bridge immediately. In the time it took him to burst onto the bridge half-dressed and wide-eyed, we could both see a good portion of a new crescent moon rising above the horizon – directly in front of us… Not my finest hour.

Ken Blackmon in Navy uniform standing with family

3. Name: Kenneth R. Blackmon

Title/Company: Private Wealth Advisor / Blackmon & Associates Wealth Management

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  I was commissioned an Ensign from The George Washington University Naval ROTC program and currently hold the rank of Rear Admiral Lower Half in the U.S. Navy Reserve, while also running my Ameriprise Financial Planning practice for the past 27 years.

Service Dates:  May 1989 – Present

Work you did: I was a Surface Warfare Officer while on active duty, serving as Navigator aboard a U.S. Navy destroyer during Desert Storm. In the U.S. Navy Reserve, I have commanded five units, mobilized in support of U.S. Pacific Fleet in 2003 and in support of U.S.

Brief story that stands out from your service time: When I mobilized in 2003, I was fortunate to have my wife Debbie and 15-month old twin daughters Alyssa and Chloe join me in Pearl Harbor for six months of my nine-month mobilization. I did shift work in the Fleet Command Center, so we would have a couple days off each week. We capitalized on that time to spend together as a family. Chloe and Alyssa learned to walk in the courtyard of the military housing area.

There were a number of other Navy personnel also mobilized that became “uncles” to our daughters. One of my best friends was a Navy Seal stationed in Hawaii at the time. While his wife and children were visiting family on the mainland, he was very willing to babysit the girls for us. It was very assuring when a Navy Seal watched my daughters. They were probably never safer than at that time.

When we left Hawaii, we flew space-available on a military flight back to the East Coast. This was a nine-hour flight and quite an experience for all of us. There were no windows in the plane and the seats faced backwards in the cargo area. My daughters cried most of the trip, but because it was so loud inside the plane, no one really noticed. My wife said she felt like we were on a covert mission.

At one point in the flight, someone with a flight suit walked by and my wife caught his attention and asked him if he would discard some trash for her. It was a one-star general she asked, which mortified me. Thankfully, he was very understanding and took the trash without hesitation. My daughters have no memory of the trip, but my wife and I will never forget it.

4. Name: Louis DeCuir

Title/Company: Financial Advisor / Investor Securities Group

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Ensign / Captain

Service Dates:  1979 – 2009

Work you did: Surface Warfare Officer

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I met my wife three months before my last tour of duty ended. At the time, I thought I’d never see her again after I moved. We now have a daughter, age 4.

 Michael Delroy standing next to a helicopter

5. Name: Michael Delorey

Title/Company: OSJ / Prism Financial Group

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E-1, O-3

Service Dates:  1963 – 1977

Work you did: Enlisted, then Commissioned

Brief story that stands out from your service time: During my service time, I knew several friends that died in combat or in training, but the person I remember the most among those departed friends was LCDR Dick Shand. He was my fellow pilot on this mission when our helicopter crashed.

I was certain that day, when I was trapped on the outside of the helicopter, I was going to die. My thought, as I was on my back looking up, through the turning rotor blades, to a perfectly clear blue sky was; “At least I won’t see it happen. When we hit, the lights will go out.”

To this day, I still remember in vivid detail, how calm and logical my thought processes were during the event. There was no panic or “freezing up.” As the situation unfolded and I was presented with different circumstances, I simply made what seemed to be logical choices and proceeded. In each decision, I knew that if I did nothing — I was dead.

To this day, whenever the day-to-day pressures start to overcome me, I just remember that I should have died that day, and every day is truly a “bonus” to me. At the time of the accident, no one had heard of PTSD. I buried and compartmentalize my feelings about that day. Even today, whenever I am reminded about it, I tense up with emotion. Whenever I hear Taps, I have to control my emotions because I think of those who “gave the last full measure of devotion”; but in particular, I remember – Dick Shand.

Melissa Dennis in Navy uniform on deck of ship

 6. Name: Melissa Dennis

Title/Company: Executive Assistant / Monarch Wealth & Retirement Strategies

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E1 / E5

Service Dates:  September 2011 – October 2016

Work you did: Personnel Specialist

Brief story that stands out from your service time: NA

Tim Doehrmann in Air Force uniform with arm around his sister.

7. Name: Tim Doehrmann

Title/Company: President / Eagle Ridge Wealth Advisors

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E1 – E5

Service Dates:  1997 – 2005

Work you did: Crew Chief

Brief story that stands out from your service time: We were activated in 2003 and sent to the Middle East in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.  We had some stressful times but we made the most of it!

We were mobilized and they sent us to a hotel outside of Scott Air Force base by St. Louis to wait for our C-5 Galaxy cargo jet to take us overseas.

So, there were over 100 of us from our base at this hotel for around 3 weeks. They kept telling us we were leaving tomorrow. And since we had no idea how long we would be gone or how long the war would last, let’s just say those 3 weeks were pretty crazy to say the least.

The photo is of myself and my sister the day I returned. It was a good day!

Harold Evensky in Army uniform

8. Name: Harold Evensky

Title/Company: Founder / Evensky & Katz

Branch: US Army Medical Services Corps

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E2 to Captain

Service Dates: July 1968 – April 1981

Work you did: Industrial Hygienist

Brief story that stands out from your service time: Having the commanding General at Fort Dix pin on my Captain’s bars raising me from an E2 to Captain and then going to visit my basic training cadre. Watching their faces as I entered the barracks was the BEST!

 Harlan Fischer

9. Name: Harlan J. Fischer

Title/Company: President / Branch Financial Services, Inc.

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Airman Basic – Staff Sergeant

Service Dates:  May 1966 – March 1970

Work you did: Inventory Management Specialist

Brief story that stands out from your service time: President Nixon came to visit his daughter, Julie, at Smith College in Northampton, MA, not that far from Westover AFB. The base was on alert for over a week. Everything was painted, scrubbed, scraped and cleaned.

The whole base looked brand new and all the barracks were spotless.

Finally, Air Force One arrives with the president on it. The cabin door opened and President Nixon stepped out, waved, stepped down the stair ramp, proceeded to the awaiting limo and was promptly driven off the base. He never looked at anything.

Gary Frisina in Marine uniform.

10. Name: Gary Frisina

Title/Company: President / Atlantic Advisors

Branch: US Marine Corps

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Private /  Sgt.

Service Dates:  1968-1972

Work you did: Com/Nav ECM tech on A-6a Intruders

Brief story that stands out from your service time: My time in Vietnam was made more tolerable by visiting and helping at the China Beach Orphanage. These children were banished from their villages because they were children of Vietnamese women and US servicemen. It was a rewarding experience in a terrible war.

11. Name: Scot Hanson

Title/Company: CFP / EFS Advisors

Branch: US Navy Aviation

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E-3 / O-2

Service Dates:  1981-1988

Work you did: General Aviation

Brief story that stands out from your service time: My US Navy training made me the success I am today. I was taught dedication and commitment to excellence. No one works as hard to prepare, it carries with me to this day. Nothing in the civilian world compares to my US Navy experience.

12. Name: Hunter Hart

Title/Company: Equity Planning

Branch: US Marine Corps

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  PVT/ SGT

Service Dates: 2003 – 2007

Work you did: Supply/ Fiscal

Brief story that stands out from your service time: In 2004 while participating in Operation Cobra Gold, our unit was tasked with some community outreach programs. We helped out at schools in the area and were able to interact with many locals. I was only 18 at the time and had little worldly experience. It taught me a lot about how the US military is respected around the world and made proud to be a part of that. Also, it helped me understand that it was my responsibility to uphold that standard.

Christopher Hellie in Army uniform

13. Name: Christopher Hellie

Title/Company: Financial Advisor / Morgan Stanley

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  O1 / O3

Service Dates: May 2005 – July 2009

Work you did: Armor Officer

Brief story that stands out from your service time: We had an accident with a young Iraqi girl on the side of the road. We stopped and provided emergency medical care and then evacuated her to our main base. The young lady suffered extensive facial lacerations and went under medical care. During the entire course of the incident she did not utter a single weep. As a unit, we adopted her and her sister as we learned that they were the sole breadwinners for their family. I’ve never witnessed as much courage and bravery as I did in that young girl.

Ken Herrington in Marine Corps uniform

14. Name: Ken Herrington

Title/Company: First VP Wealth Management / Morgan Stanley

Branch: US Marine Corps

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  2d Lt / Colonel

Service Dates: 1971-2001

Work you did: Infantry Officer

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I had the honor to serve with our Nation’s heroes and had an incredible experience. Robert Kailes in Army uniform

15. Name: Robert Kailes

Title/Company: Financial Planner / Robert Kailes, CFP

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Specialist 5 E5

Service Dates:  September 1966 – September 1968

Work you did: Highly Classified Document control

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I was stationed in the Pentagon. On 4/5/68 Martin Luther King was assassinated. I got caught in the riots the next day. Two months later on 6/5/68 Robert Kennedy was assassinated and there was fear of another riot. The SCLC was camped out in front of the Lincoln memorial and was a quagmire. I was put on special assignment at police headquarters to answer the phones for the generals in charge. No riot in part because of people such as singer James Brown giving a free concert.

Daniel Kopp in Air Force uniform

16. Name: Daniel Kopp

Title/Company: Founder / Wise Stewardship Financial Planning

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  2nd Lt – Captain

Service Dates:  June 2009 – February 2018

Work you did: Air Battle Manager

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I became a financial planner in part because of the work of getting to be a volunteer financial counselor while I was on active duty. Getting to see the transformations in peoples’ lives as they paid down debt, saved for personal goals, and invested in their future was so inspiring I realized I wanted to help people with their money full time.

Patrick B. Lough headshot

17. Name: Patrick B. Lough

Title/Company: Financial Planner / Charter Financial Planning

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Enlisted: Pvt.-Sgt. / Officer: 2nd Lt.-Captain

Service Dates:  1977 – 1985

Work you did: Enlisted 1977-1981, 95B Military Police. Artillery Officer 1981-1985, Fist Chief, Battery Executive Officer, Battalion Fire Support Officer. Airborne Ranger.

Brief story that stands out from your service time: When we jumped into Grenada as Part of Operation Urgent Fury in 1983, there was a Brig. General on our plane that was making his first jump in 20 years. He said to us, “Hell of a refresher course, huh, men”

Colin Mackenzie Marine Corps standing next to a helicopter

18. Name: Colin Mackenzie

Title/Company: Regional Director / Cetera Advisor Networks

Branch: US Marine Corps

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Midshipman – US Naval Academy

Service Dates: 1973 – 1983

Work you did: Helicopter Pilot

Brief story that stands out from your service time: In February 1982 we were tasked with flying some people from our ship to Pusan Int’l Airport in South Korea. My co-pilot (Bill Tarbutton- “Button”) seemed to be having difficulties understanding the Korean air traffic controllers. “Hey, Button, do you want me to take it?” “Uh, YEAH!”

After landing and taking off our helmets, Button looks at me and says, “Don’t tell me you understood what they were saying!” Asking him about the wind direction and likely runway landing. I mentioned to him, with a big grin on my face, that “I was just listening for what they were going to tell me.” He got to fly us back to the ship and had no problems “understanding” the Korean flight controllers on the way back.

Courtney McElvain headshot

19. Name: Courtney McElvain

Title/Company: Vice President/Investments / Stifel

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Spec 4 to Spec 5

Service Dates:  February 2002 – April 2004

Work you did: Korean Linguist

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I moved back to the US from teaching English in China, one week before Sept. 11, 2001. After the shock of that week, I felt compelled to use my degree in English to serve in the Army as a linguist. Military service builds an unmatched sense of patriotism, and I’m so thankful. And, I met my husband of 16 years, who served as an Arabic linguist in the Air Force.

Michael Nelan Army uniform

20. Name: Michael Nelan

Title/Company: President / Nelan Financial & Insurance Services

Branch: US Army & US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  PVT E1 (Army) / CMSgt E9 (Air Force)

Service Dates:  September 1981 – Present

Work you did: Avionics, Civil Engineering, Aircraft Maintenance Superintendent

Brief story that stands out from your service time: Currently, I am still serving in the Nevada Air National Guard. My brother, Dan, was a huge influence. He was a helicopter pilot in Vietnam and retired as a Brigadier General.

Neal Nolan in Army uniform with young boy

21. Name: Neal Nolan

Title/Company: Senior Financial Advisor / Parsec Financial

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E2 / E3

Service Dates:  1991 – 1992

Work you did: Medical Specialist (Medic)

Brief story that stands out from your service time: During my voluntary deployment for Hurricane Andrew relief in 1992, as a medic I was tasked with ensuring that the combat engineers were following proper heat-related protocols. We were working in an urban area clearing streets of debris, often clearing many blocks in a day.

On a whim, I walked to the opposite side of one of the blocks and there was this young child watching me with great admiration. I turned to walk in the opposite direction and the kid’s father approached me. In his broken English, he explained that the boy was so excited to see a soldier in real life and that he wanted to be one when he grew up. The boy was too shy to ask but the father said that he would love to have his picture made with me. Naturally, I agreed. During a time of utter devastation, it was a welcome distraction to bring a little joy to someone’s life, especially to a young child.

William O'Donnell in Army uniform

22. Name: William O’Donnell

Title/Company: CFP / AVH Invest

Branch: US Air Force & US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  CW3

Service Dates:  1994 – 2014

Work you did: Helicopter Pilot

Brief story that stands out from your service time: In my 20 years of service, I had the honor of serving with many great men and women in various units including in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of those, the one person who stands out the most is now my wife, Rachel. We met in Iraq, and 16 years later we are still together. I wouldn’t be where I am today without her!

William Orchard-Hays in Air Force uniform

23. Name: William Orchard-Hays III

Title/Company: Financial Planner & Investment Advisor Rep / HBW Partners DBA Stepwise Financial

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  A1C / SSGT

Service Dates:  August 1969 – August 1973

Work you did: Systems Monitor for Base Finances, Data Automation

Brief story that stands out from your service time: First few days at Wurtsmith AF Base in Oscoda, MI, my young bride and I had to stay in a trailer (no Base Housing available) at the beginning of the airport runway. At night, the trailer shook as the B-52s and fighter jets revved up their engines before taking off. Additionally, it snowed. It was Oct. 21st!

Brad Pendleton in Marine Corps uniform

24. Name: Brad Pendleton

Title/Company: VP Investments / Stifel

Branch: US Marine Corps

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Private / Corporal

Service Dates:  1984 – 1989

Work you did: Combat Engineer

Brief story that stands out from your service time: Pleased to have had the opportunity to serve this great country.

Kevin S. Rademacher in Navy uniform

25. Name: Kevin S. Rademacher

Title/Company: Senior Wealth Manager / Financial Life Advisors

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E-1 / E-5

Service Dates:  1996 – 2001

Work you did: Hospital Corpsman

Brief story that stands out from your service time: My most memorable experience while serving in the military was flying in an older aircraft which started losing cabin pressure at 30,000+ feet, the air masks fell from ceiling, and thankfully we made a successful emergency landing!

Nicholas Remer with war paint

26. Name: Nicholas Remer

Title/Company: Wealth Manager / Cetera Investors

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  E1 – E4

Service Dates:  June 2006 – October 2011

Work you did: Various roles

Brief story that stands out from your service time: Experience I won’t forget: During BUDS (Basic Underwater Demolition School/ SEAL Training) while assisting as one of the lower classes were going through Hell week, a couple guys in our class drove the SEAL Instructor’s Humvee too close to the water and got it stuck. The tide rose and we nearly lost the Humvee completely. After getting it towed back up to the dry beach, our class proctor found seaweed in the vehicle and found out what happened. All 200 of us were punished together on the beach. It sucked, but we embraced it and it was fun looking back.

Experience I am most grateful for: Leading up to the Olympic Games in 2008 I was given orders to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo., to train and make a run for Beijing.

Angela (Angie) Ribuffo headshot

27. Name: Angela (Angie) Ribuffo

Title/Company: President & Financial Advisor / Raion Financial Strategies / Lincoln Financial Securities

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  2nd Lieutenant / Captain

Service Dates:  July 1979 – March 1984

Work you did: Air Force Nurse/Flight Nurse

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I was stationed at a Strategic Air Command (SAC) base in the upper peninsula of Michigan. The winters there are harsh and every year we have many blizzards that closed down the base. One winter the weather was unusually harsh.

As a flight nurse, at a SAC base, my job was to coordinate any medivacs to larger hospitals. I was notified that we had a critically ill infant that needed to be medevac’d out to Wilford Hall Hospital in Texas. We had a C-130 medevac airplane scheduled to come in for the infant but as it got close to the base a winter storm descended on the base and closed the runway. The closest the plane could get was the local airport at Green Bay, Wisconsin, 170 miles away and more than a 3-hour drive in good weather. The C-130 would meet us in Green Bay if we could get there.

The baby was getting more critical as time passed but the weather wouldn’t let up so we decided to drive the infant to the airplane. We coordinated with the state police in Michigan and Wisconsin, base and civilian snow plows and our ambulance crew. We drove that baby all the way to Green Bay with the Michigan state police and snow plows clearing the way and handing off to the Wisconsin police and snow plows all the way to the Green Bay airport where we handed off our most precious cargo, our infant, for its flight to Texas. Our baby made it to the ICU at Wilford Hall and recovered. That’s what it’s all about when you’re in the military. Adapt and Overcome!

Mark Robertson in Army uniform

28. Name: Mark Robertson

Title/Company: Managing Partner / RDJ Financial Architects

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Private – Colonel

Service Dates:  1976 – 2019

Work you did: Served in a variety of positions. Work included setting up foreign banks on NATO military installations throughout Afghanistan and Iraq; Senior Military Advisor to State Department; Support of US Humanitarian Efforts in Syria; Joint Military Planning

Brief story that stands out from your service time: There is a comradery in the military that is near impossible to replicate in the civilian world. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines share a common experience of service, dedication and a willingness to give their lives in defense of others. It is this esprit de corps and bond of brotherhood and sisterhood that I cherish. My memories are filled with individuals who selflessly served. My son is one of them.

Although he was in college on a scholarship, he volunteered to join the Army and learn Arabic. He knew he would be sent to Iraq at a time that the US was faltering and soldiers were being killed and maimed. When I told him that he didn’t have to do this, all he said was, “I know Dad.” It was an honor for me to serve with him in a combat zone. Both of us returned home without any physical scars.

Jose Rafael Rodriguez legacy of service award

29. Name: Jose Rafael Rodriguez

Title/Company: President / Rodriguez Financial Strategies

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Colonel

Service Dates:  May 1978 – April 2004

Work you did: Weapons Systems Acquisition

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I had a mentor throughout my military career; never on my chain of command but always there to guide me. Jeffrey B. Stoll in Army uniform next to a Flag

30. Name: Jeffrey B. Stoll

Title/Company: CPA, CFP / Jeffrey B. Stoll, CPA, CFP

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Private, E-1, Specialist 5th Class, E-5

Service Dates:  1963 – 1966

Work you did: Required Secret Clearance

Brief story that stands out from your service time: Stationed at SHAPE, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe for 2 years.

Erik Sutcliffe in Air Force uniform in a helicopter

31. Name: Erik Sutcliffe

Title/Company: Advisor / Alpha Financial

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Colonel

Service Dates: 1990 to Present

Work you did: missile launch officer / logistics / aircraft maintenance

Brief story that stands out from your service time: After 30 years, there are more stories forgotten than remembered. As I near retirement, it’s hard to leave, as it’s about the friendships and bonds created over the years. In the private sector, competition can be viewed as a threat. In the military, knowing there are highly intelligent and capable people ready for leadership to meet tomorrow’s challenges is comforting. Aaron Terwedo in Army uniform

32. Name: Aaron Terwedo

Title/Company: Financial Advisor / TFS Advisors

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  PVT / SGT

Service Dates:  March 2004 – August 2011

Work you did: Field Artillery

Brief story that stands out from your service time: It amazed me how people from all different walks of life and different upbringings can come to work together.

33. Name: Cameron M. Thornton

Title/Company: President & CEO / CTA Wealth Advisors

Branch: US Navy

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Ensign / LT

Service Dates:  June 1976 – October 1980

Work you did: NA

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I love the “sense of humor” the Navy had when I was a young officer. My undergraduate degree was in Psychology. After commissioning, I attended and graduated from Surface Warfare Officer school and immediately reported to the USS Cook, FF 1083, stationed in San Diego, CA.

I was tagged to become the Main Propulsion Assistant (1200 PSI Steam System). In preparation for this job, I attended an eight-week class to learn how to become a Steam Engineer. I was exposed to the various shipboard steam, propulsion and auxiliary equipment that I would soon be responsible for managing. The best thing going for me was not my technical abilities, but rather my people skills and my ability to interface well with my Master Chief, Senior Chief and two Chief Petty Officers who happily handled all technical aspects required for the safe and efficient operation of our power plant on the Cook. To each of these men, I thank them for a job well done and for providing me with the opportunity to learn hands-on about the tenants of responsibility, leadership and accountability that comes with being a junior military officer. Mitchell Wassink in Army uniform

34. Name: Mitchell Wassink

Title/Company: Financial Advisor, AIF / Kuipers Advisors

Branch: US Army

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Sergeant E-5

Service Dates:  April 1997 – April 2005

Work you did: Convoy Security Operation Iraqi Freedom 1 & 2

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I want to take this opportunity to honor my friend and Platoon Leader Lt Matthew Stovall. He gave his life for our country and I will remember him forever. Our job was not fun but we did it anyway. We did it because we love our country and our Flag!

Scott A Webb headshot

35. Name: Scott A Webb

Title/Company: Financial Advisor / Woodbury Financial / Total Resource Financial

Branch: US Air Force

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Airman Basic / Senior Airman

Service Dates:  May 2001 – September 2011

Work you did: Ground Radio Maintenance Journeyman

Brief story that stands out from your service time: I once sent a new airman to the flight line vehicle repair shop to get the halogen fluid in the headlamps topped off. Vehicle maintenance played along and kept him there for hours, saying that the vehicle was unsafe to operate without full halogen fluid in each light, and he would have to search the shop to find more, or order it online from base supply.

David T Wilson headshot

36. Name: David T Wilson

Title/Company: Financial Advisor & State Rep. in State of Connecticut

Branch: US Coast Guard

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  AM2

Service Dates:  May 1967 – February 1972

Work you did: SAR Structures & Hydraulics Mech

Brief story that stands out from your service time: Great friends made while at CGAS San Juan.Clayton J. Winkler in Army uniform sitting on steps

37. Name: Clayton J. Winkler

Title/Company: CFP & Owner / Cobblestone Financial Services

Branch: US Army / Army Reserves

Rank held at beginning of service and at end:  Private to Specialist / Cadet 2nd Lieutenant

Service Dates:  March 1995 – December 2000

Work you did: Counter Intelligence Analyst & Financial Executive Officer

Brief story that stands out from your service time: My final assignment was serving at a Financial Detachment in South Korea. Our US Forces served with KATUSA’s (Korean Augments To United States Army) and it was such a pleasure to meet the young men of Korea who were required to serve their country’s Army.

I bonded with many of them, learning about their culture and many of their customs (especially when eating out and dining together). We were also competitive in Physical Fitness contests. A funny story (kept short) was how they were determined to beat me in our Physical Training Contests, specifically in a 1 mile sprint race – and they were unsuccessful overall.

— Check out our Advisors Who Serve(d) page to read stories by advisors from previous years.