12. Alabama | Total score: 50.88 | Affordability: 2 | Quality of life: 46 | Health care: 48
11. Hawaii | Total score: 50.66 | Affordability: 49 | Quality of life: 34 | Health care: 2
10. Maryland | Total score: 50.55 | Affordability: 42 | Quality of life: 30 | Health care: 19
9. Louisiana | Total score: 50.06 | Affordability: 10 | Quality of life: 45 | Health care: 45
8. Mississippi | Total score: 48.87 | Affordability: 3 | Quality of life: 50 | Health care: 50

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7. Arkansas | Total score: 48.53 | Affordability: 11 | Quality of life: 49 | Health care: 46
6. New Mexico | Total score: 47.92 | Affordability: 33 | Quality of life: 47 | Health care: 39
5. New Jersey | Total score: 47.85 | Affordability: 45 | Quality of life: 33 | Health care: 29
4. Vermont | Total score: 47.76 | Affordability: 50 | Quality of life: 6 | Health care: 23
3. West Virginia | Total score: 47.26 | Affordability: 22 | Quality of life: 41 | Health care: 49

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2. Rhode Island | Total score: 45.94 | Affordability: 46 | Quality of life: 43 | Health care: 18
1. Kentucky | Total score: 43.85 | Affordability: 32 | Quality of life: 48 | Health care: 47

(Related: 12 Best States for Retirement: 2019)

Some Americans cannot retire when they want to because of finances, the personal finance website WalletHub reports.

Citing U.S. Federal Reserve data, it notes that 25% of nonretired people have no pension or retirement savings, not necessarily through their own fault.

For those in a quandary about retirement, where they live can add to their burden.

Alaska, for instance, is the state with the lowest percentage of people 65 and older, yet has the highest share of that population still working at 23%. In contrast, Florida has the most older folks, but is among the states with the lowest percentage of them still working.

WalletHub compared the 50 states to determine the best and worst ones for retirement. Researchers evaluated the three key dimensions of affordability, quality of life and health care, using 46 metrics and grading each one on a 100-point scale with 100 being the most favorable conditions for retirement.

Have a look at the gallery above to see the 12 states it found to be the worst for retirement.

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