The Florida planners that have been battling with the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards over how they disclose their compensation will get their day in court on Sept. 7, when a District of Columbia appeals court will hear oral arguments in their case to appeal an earlier decision in favor of the CFP Board.

Jeffrey and Kimberly Camarda said last August that they were appealing the ruling by Judge Richard J. Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia dismissing their case against the CFP Board in order to right “grave wrongs” the decision places on the industry.

Leon stated in his unsealed ruling that the CFP Board “followed its own rules throughout the disciplinary proceedings” against the Camardas when the Board claimed they violated its fee-only definition in reference to their firm, Camarda Wealth Advisory, in Fleming Island, Florida.

The appellate judge can uphold Leon’s decision or overturn it, in which case there could be a trial or a settlement.

A spokesman for the Camardas said Thursday that they were not commenting on the Sept. 7 date to hear oral arguments.

CFP Board said in a previous statement that it “believes that the judge’s decision will stand and that an appeals court will agree with Judge Leon that CFP Board ‘followed its own rules throughout the disciplinary proceedings,’ and that there is ‘no evidence that [CFP Board] was motivated by bad faith or ill will’ in disciplining the Camardas.”

CFP Board announced last May that it would launch a new investigative process to identify certificants who inaccurately disclose their compensation methods on the Board website’s “Find a CFP” tool.

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