Employees of firms that manage the 401(k) plans for clients also provide retirement accounts for their own employees. For the third consecutive year, we turn to BrightScope to check out which financial firms offer the best and worst retirement plans for their workers.

As in past years, firms bounced around the rankings, with last year’s No.1, Stifel, falling a bit. Also, UBS and Merrill Lynch were not rated as they were in past years.

(Related: 12 Best & Worst Broker-Dealer 401(k) Plans: 2015)

BrightScope uses 200 pieces of data to rate 401(k) plans. An algorithm then runs thousands of simulations to predict how long average participant would need to be ready for retirement.

BrightScope also qunatifies what a lower-rated plan can cost employees. It breaks out the “lost savings” to employees from saving in their plan versus the top-rated plan and the additional years they would need to work to make up that sum. For example, the average LPL employee would need to work 11 more years to make up the $132,200 she would have saved by working at the firm with the best-in-group rating.

The average rating for plans in the peer groups was about 90. The highest among the dozen firms we looked at was 85 and the lowest 74. Peer groups consisted of companies with similar demographic makeups, but not all firms in a peer group are in the same industry.

Take a look at the 11 Best & Worst Broker-Dealer 401(k) Plans for 2016:

JP Morgan Sign on a building in NYC. (Photo: AP)

11 (tie). JPMORGAN CHASE

Rating: 74

Highest in Peer Group: 91

Additional Years of Work: 12

Lost Savings: N/A ($53,200 in 2015)

Plan Assets: $20.8 billion

Average Account Balance: $76,000

11 (tie). LADENBURG THALMANN

Rating: 74

Highest in Peer Group: 92

Additional Years of Work: 13

Lost Savings: $41,500

Plan Assets: $19.6 million

Average Account Balance: $83,000

Mark Casady, CEO of LPL Financial.

9. LPL FINANCIAL

Rating: 75

Highest in Peer Group: 91

Additional Years of Work: 11

Lost Savings: $132,200

Plan Assets: $171 million

Average Account Balance: $46,000

Paul Reilly, CEO of Raymond James Financial.

8. RAYMOND JAMES

Rating: 76

Highest in Peer Group: 90

Additional Years of Work: 9

Lost Savings: $82,000

Plan Assets: $720 million

Average Account Balance: $71,000

Ronald Kruszewski, CEO of Stifel Financial. (Photo: AP)

7. STIFEL FINANCIAL CORP.

Rating: 78

Highest in Peer Group: 93

Additional Years of Work: 11

Lost Savings: $128,200

Plan Assets: $764 million

Average Account Balance: $110,000

Wells Fargo Headquarters in San Francisco. (Photo: AP)

6. WELLS FARGO

Rating: 79

Highest in Peer Group: 90

Additional Years of Work: 9

Lost Savings: $54,400

Plan Assets: $36.3 billion

Average Account Balance: $110,000

Michael Corbat, CEO of Citigroup. (Photo: AP)

5 (tie). AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL

Rating: 80

Highest in Peer Group: 93

Additional Years of Work: 10

Lost Savings: $102,200 last year

Plan Assets: $1.57 billion

Average Account Balance: $130,000

5 (tie). CITIGROUP

Rating: 80

Highest in Peer Group: 90

Additional Years of Work: 8

Lost Savings: $15,000

Plan Assets: $11.3 billion

Average Account Balance: $69,000

Brian Moynihan, President and CEO of Bank of America. (Photo: AP)

3. BANK OF AMERICA

Rating: 81

Highest in Peer Group: 88

Additional Years of Work: 5

Lost Savings: $51,500

Plan Assets: $19.7 billion

Average Account Balance: $85,000

James Gorman, CEO of Morgan Stanley. (Photo: AP)

2. MORGAN STANLEY

Rating: 84

Highest in Peer Group: 91

Additional Years of Work: 6

Lost Savings: N/A ($116,300 in 2015)

Plan Assets: $7.9 billion

Average Account Balance: $140,000

Goldman Sachs headquarters in NY. (Photo: AP)

1. GOLDMAN SACHS

Rating: 85

Highest in Peer Group: 90

Additional Years of Work: 5

Lost Savings: N/A ($85,700 in 2014)

Plan Assets: $6.38 billion

Average Account Balance: $210,000

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