Members of the long-term care (LTC) planning community are trying to shake off the challenges facing life insurers this month and focus on getting consumers to think about LTC needs.

November is Long-Term Care Awareness Month.

Genworth Financial is trying to make the most of the month by holding a briefing in New York this week on the effects of aging on financial planning. The company is streaming the event live on the Web. Northwestern Mutual released results of an LTC planning survey last week.

Trade groups are also joining in. The National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA) ran a blog entry encouraging members to learn more about LTC planning, and NAIFA’s New Mexico chapter got Gov. Susana Martinez to sign a proclamation recognizing the awareness effort. The group organized a panel discussion on LTC planning that included a local elder law attorney and the administrator of an LTC facility.

The Wisconsin Education Association — a labor group for teachers — posted an awareness month infographic on its website.

Many brokers, agents and other financial professionals are also taking part.

MAGA Insurance Services notes in its latest long-term care insurance (LTCI) newsletter that, at MAGA, “every month is Long-Term Care Awareness Month.” But, in its latest newsletter, the firm has told agents and brokers about a new trend at nursing homes: facilities using filial responsibility laws to sue residents’ adult children over unpaid bills.

Ash Brokerage, another distributor, is encouraging agents and brokers to try new kinds of LTC planning themes, such as, “Long-term care planning makes sense,” and “Giving thanks with families.

Burling Insurance Group has posted a blog entry with the headline, “Long-term care planning — It’s time to start,” and a Long-Term Care Awareness Month Web ad from the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance.

Many members of the LTC community are using social media to try to raise awareness.

First Command, LifeSecure and Lincoln Financial are examples of some of the organizations hoping they can drum up a little extra awareness in 140 characters or fewer.

Lincoln Financial tried using a riddle, asking, “How much do you think a home health aide costs per hour?” and promising to answer the question the next day.

Awareness month even had some effects overseas: In Australia, Melissa Crawford, an agent there, linked to an awareness month report Swiss Re put out.

The report is as thought-provoking for Australians as for people from the United States, Crawford tweeted.