In response to Sheryl J. Moore’s article: “Indexed life as a replacement for indexed annuities?”

Sheryl,
Could you provide an actual reason why it cannot be used to supplement a client’s other retirement savings vehicles? You say suitability, but 90 percent-plus of IA prospects have a need for permanent life protection.

Why would it not be suitable to utilize an overfunded IUL for this purpose? As long as a steady income of loans was taken, the DB will usually be around the initial issue amount at bare minimum.

Your extremely brief article has made a lot of generalizations without any real evidence to back them up. Does your opinion of IUL extend to WL as well?
~TM

I didn’t say that indexed life should not be used to supplement other retirement vehicles. I said that you should not ever sell indexed life as an alternative for an indexed annuity, if the need for life insurance does not exist. Where did you get your statistic regarding “90-percent-plus of IA prospects” needing permanent life protection? Our sales data shows that the average issue age for indexed annuity purchasers is 63. Most people have already purchased their life insurance coverage long before attaining this age.

What if a “steady income of loans” is taken to the point where the policyholder has a taxable event?

Yes, my opinion on this issue extends to all forms of cash value life insurance. If the client only needs a retirement accumulation/payout vehicle, cash value life insurance should not be the product that is considered as a solution.

In addition, have we forgotten that an annuity is the only product that can guarantee an income that the prospect cannot outlive? 
~Sheryl J. Moore


In response to Daniel D. Williams’ blog: “Should annuity advisors diversify or specialize?”

Hi Daniel,
As a trainer, coach and mentor to insurance agents, advisors and planners, if you want to make the big money you have to be a specialist in your marketing efforts to consistently attract your ideal prospects to you. Then once they are in the door, you have to take care of all their needs and wants. You do what you can do for them and bring in a specialist when needed.
~Lew Nason 

Perhaps a better question is, do you want to specialize and become an expert in your field? To become an expert you first have to specialize. As an expert in your field you will have the opportunity to network with other experts. One way to becoming an expert is with the help of professional coaches who can provide guidance and direction.
~Paul J. Cross/ANBC

One issue that any “annuity advisor” must grapple with is licensure. If you hold an insurance license (which allows you to sell declared-rate and indexed fixed annuities) but are not a registered representative, you may not sell, recommend, or give advice regarding a variable annuity or other product registered as a security. We all know that. But there are some implications to that condition that may not be immediately apparent to some advisors and that can be problematic in their activities.
~jolsen02