Women are twice as likely as men to say their top financial worry is not being able to save enough for retirement.

About 22% of women cite their ability to save for retirement as a top concern, compared with just 11% of men, according to AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, New York, a unit of AXA S.A., Paris.

AXA Equitable commissioned a poll of 504 U.S. women and 496 U.S. men ages 25 to 70 who were “mass affluent.” They were financial decision-makers with household incomes of at least $75,000 or investable assets between $250,000 and $999,999.

Only 28% of the women who participated said they had recovered “all or most” of their retirement savings since the economic downturn began, compared with 37% of the men, and 72% of the women said they had recovered “some or none” of their retirement savings, compared with 63% of the men.

Women expressed less confidence in their ability to invest in stocks, and they were less likely to report that they had made changes in their retirement asset allocations.

The gap affected women who had invested in individual stocks and exchange-traded funds as well as those who had invested in other types of assets.

About 89% of the women called protecting the principal of their investments through guarantees “extremely or very important, compared with 83% of the men.

Women who said they had used financial professionals seem to be doing better than other women polled: 41% of the women who use financial professionals said they had recovered at least some of their losses, compared with 28% of the women who are doing without professional advice.