Kerry Johnson
Another way of bridging is with seminar attendees. When participants book an appointment at the seminar, you have a presold prospect. But those who want to think more about it are sometimes more difficult to reach, physically and emotionally. You need to call them after the seminar using these types of questions.

First, ask if they enjoyed the seminar and the food. Did they like the venue? These questions will help break the ice. Then ask:

  1. What did you hope to gain by coming to the seminar? (If they say only the food, move on.)
  2. What are your biggest worries right now about your investments? (If they say nothing, “prime the pump” … ) “Is it volatility? Running out of money in retirement? The government taking your assets in probate?”
  3. What are you invested in right now? Are you happy with your retirement plan?

If and when you can get them to tell you what they hoped to gain from the seminar and what their worries are, try
to close by saying:

“If we could help you (state their worry and a benefit), would you be interested in coming in to talk?”

If they say no, you haven’t done a good job of bridging and probing for needs. If they say yes, you have just booked a good appointment. Just make sure you qualify them. Don’t spend time with those who can’t buy. Also make sure they are the types of prospects you want to spend time with.