We’ve all heard the “experts” drone on and on about the importance of “quality” when it comes to leads. Isn’t the concept of developing quality obvious enough? Of course, we’d all love to have only those leads in our funnel that turn into valuable customers. However, this isn’t always the reality.

What is frequently neglected or downplayed is the necessity for quantity. Like it or not, sales is inherently a numbers game. If you currently have three “quality” prospects, but you need 10 new customers this month, you’re not going to be successful. To reach your goal, a significant amount of time must simply be spent on gathering new leads.

To balance the demands of acquiring both quantity and quality in your sales funnel requires constant multitasking. Let one ball drop and your sales funnel will deplete. What do you need to do to maintain the balance necessary to keep the sales flowing? Here are a few helpful tips:

Regular prospecting
Make it an absolute must to reach out to a set amount of new prospects each and every day. Let’s face it–the more calls you make, the more opportunities you will discover. It’s not rocket science.

Aggressively network

As part of your regular routine to make contact with new prospects, networking must be a priority. You’ll need to do more than just attend the quarterly get-together for your friends in the industry. Seek out online and in-person opportunities with enthusiasm. Help others by generously providing referrals and introductions and take advantage of any that you receive, too.

Don’t make assumptions

Sometimes the best customers come from the most unlikely of places. Don’t dismiss leads or introductions because you think they have little potential for you. Value every opportunity and find out as much as you can before you drop contact with anyone.

Keep organized

Leads are valuable, so keep track of them efficiently. Develop your own contact management system and stay on top of where each lead is within your sales funnel. Don’t let even one slip through the cracks because of an inability to manage the sales process.