The next generation of retirees may be more willing to try new financial instruments to improve their standard of living.

Researchers at NAVA, Reston, Va., have commissioned surveys supporting that hypothesis.

An outside survey firm polled 1,004 “adult children” ages 45 to 65, with annual household income of $75,000 or more or total household savings and investments of $100,000 or more.

The survey firm also contacted 100 retired elderly parents ages 70 to 80 with at least $100,000 in savings and investments at the time of retirement.

About 86% of the adult children said they expect to have a higher standard of living in retirement than their own parents have had, while 66% of the elderly parents said they expect their children to have a higher standard of post-retirement living.

Ninety-three percent of the adult children said they will be more willing than their parents to try new types of financial products, and 67% of the elderly parents expect their children to be more willing to try new types of products.

But only 31% of the elderly parents expect their children to invest much more aggressively, and only 37% of the adult children surveyed said they expect to be much different from their parents in terms of efforts to preserve their nest eggs.