Boomers and current retirees share a deepening concern about soaring costs.

Pre-retirees and retirees also worry about protecting the value of their assets from inflation, having enough money to pay for long term care, paying for adequate health care, and maintaining a reasonable standard of living after the loss of a spouse, according to the authors of the Risks and Process of Retirement Survey Report from the Society of Actuaries, Schaumburg, Ill.

When the researchers commissioned a survey, they found that 57% of the participating retirees and 63% of pre-retirees cited inflation as one of the top retirement risks, while 52% of the retirees and 63% of the pre-retirees cited affording long term care as a major concern.

Affording adequate health care ranked third. That concern was cited by 51% of the retirees and 69% of the pre-retirees.

The authors of the SOA survey report also found a noticeable retirement concern gender gap.

Women are more concerned than men about inflation, with 62% of female participants and only 51% of the male participants identifying inflation as a top concern.

Women might be more concerned because 65-year-old women have an average life expectancy of 20 years, compared with an average life expectancy of 17 years for 65-year-old men, the authors of the survey report note.

The percentage of women expressing concern about various issues also was about 10 percentage points higher for affording long term care and affording acute medical care, and the percentage of women showing more concern was 15 percentage points higher for “depleting savings.”