“The MetLife Study of Women and Generational Differences” found that women are less likely to become like their mothers than the old adage insinuates.

The survey asked women from the World War II Generation, the Silent Generation, early and late baby boomers, and Generation X members for their thoughts on retirement and money. It found younger women expect to have a more active retirement with pursuits like travel, extended careers and heavy social interaction. These same women, however, are going to enter retirement with significantly more debt than their mothers.

Daughters are almost twice as likely to have at least $25,000 in consumer debt. Mothers say they tell daughters to live within their means, but daughters say they would have told their mothers – if given the chance when their mothers were growing up – to not forget their dreams and be “willing to spend money if it will make you happy.”

Other findings include the following:

Daughters will work longer. Seventy-five percent of mothers retired before the age of 65, but only 37 percent of daughters predict they will retire that early. Married women are more likely to retire earlier than non-married women.

Daughters expect different sources of retirement income. Seventy-seven percent of daughters say their retirement will be funded by employer-sponsored retirement plans; only 46 percent of mothers say the same thing. Ninety percent of mothers say Social Security is a source of retirement income; only 75 percent of daughters say they will count on the government program.

More than half of daughters think their retirement will exceed their mothers’, but only four in 10 mothers agree.

The full survey is available at www.maturemarketinstitute.com.