As baby boomers move toward retirement and start thinking about getting older, a natural inclination is to think about who will take care of them in their old age and how that care will be paid for.

Financial advisors are well-positioned to address these questions with the services and products they offer. But if advisors are not addressing the cost of long term care, they may not be doing all they can for clients, according to Gerald Summers at GoldenCare USA.

“The last thing any financial planner should want to hear is one or more of their suddenly disabled
clients with long term care requirements ask why LTCI wasn’t brought to their attention,” said Summers, director of GoldenCare’s Financial Planning Division.

Financial planners need to think about LTCI as asset protection – and they need to position it
that way with clients and prospects, Summers said. To do that, advisors should place long term care planning on the same footing as tax, estate and investment planning. Alliances with LTCI
specialists or with LTCI organizations can give advisors the knowledge and tools they need to help clients. As boomers become the new seniors, neglecting LTCI as part of the financial plan can cause trouble for advisors and consumers alike.