Many U.S. residents who tend both to children and to older relatives are having a hard time preparing for their own retirement.

Researchers at Hartford Financial Services Group Inc., Hartford, have reported that finding in a summary of results from a survey of 750 U.S. adults ages 45 and older who make financial decisions for their households, along with similar surveys of adults ages 45 and older in Germany, Japan, South Korea and the United Kingdom.

About 28% of the U.S. participants said they are in the sandwich generation, compared with 23% in the United Kingdom, 29% in Japan, 40% in Germany and 49% in South Korea.

In other countries, the share of two-generation caregivers who said sandwich generation caregiving affected their ability to handle day-to-day expenses, such as mortgage payments, ranged from 14% to 26%. In the United States, about 29% of the members of the sandwich generation said they are having a hard time with day-to-day expenses.

When asked about saving, 10% to 22% of the sandwich generation caregivers in other countries said they had had to reduce or put off saving for retirement or other goals. In the United States, about 28% of the sandwich generation caregivers reported that they had had to cut back on savings.