Striking achievements are made by very successful salespeople based on a very simple rule: We tend to do business with those we like.

What is it about those we like that attracts us and creates compliance and commitment? And, how can you use these laws to ethically influence your prospects to become long-term clients?

One characteristic of trust lies in the degree to which someone is physically attractive. This is both simple and complex. Attractive people seem to elicit more trust in the short term. Researcher Robert Cialdini of Arizona State University reports that physical attractiveness falls into the category called “the halo effect.” Some of his research has indicated that we automatically think of good-looking people as talented, kind, honest and intelligent.

Canadian researchers discovered that attractive political candidates received more than two and a half times as many votes as less-attractive candidates. In fact, American research psychologists have discovered that in U.S. presidential elections, the taller of the two candidates nearly always wins.

While this is not surprising, it certainly is interesting that we sometimes fail to listen to logic and reason in favor of whether or not someone attracts us. How could this happen? The “halo effect” seems to be all around us. At the Washington-based Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association, researchers who study what attractiveness means recently reported that good-looking people are less likely to be convicted of crimes, more likely to be hired for jobs, and more likely to get a higher salary. They also reported them as more kind, interesting and competent.

Kerry L. Johnson, MBA, Ph.D. is an author, Senior Market Advisor columnist and frequent speaker at financial planning and insurance conferences. He operates Peak Performance Coaching, a one-on-one, fast-track coaching program. Visit www.kerryjohnson.com or call 800-883-8787 for more information.